PART EIGHTEEN

 

The Main Suffolk Line - 1745 to 1800

 

This is the second of five sections of Part 18 of the Collett family

 

Updated December 2015

 

 

 

18M1

Cornelius Wade Collett was born in 1744, one year after his parents, Cornelius Collett and Jane Wade, were married at Rendlesham.  He was baptised at Melton, where his father had been baptised twenty-five years earlier, the ceremony taking place of 24th March 1744.  Cornelius was 21 years of age when he married Elizabeth Randall by licence at Orford on 6th May 1765.  However, it was after only two years together that Cornelius Collett died and was buried at Orford, south of Aldeburgh, on 3rd July 1767.  It was always known that he died before his father, who passed away in 1790, since had he been alive at that time, he would have inherited Westerfield Manor.

 

 

 

 

18M2

John Blomfield Collett was born at Westerfield during 1745 where he was baptised on 9th March 1745, the second son of Cornelius and Jane Collett.  He was around 21 years old when he died and was buried at Westerfield on 21st November 1766.

 

 

 

 

18M3

Milleson Collett was born at Westerfield in 1747, and was baptised there on 11th September 1747, the youngest of the three sons of Cornelius Collett and Jane Wade.  Tragically it was only six weeks later that he was buried at Westerfield on 16th October 1747.

 

 

 

 

18M4

Margaret Collett was born at Melton in 1762 where she was baptised on 30th January 1762, the only known child of Cornelius Collett and his third wife Anne.  She only survived for another five days when she was buried at Melton on 4th February 1762, when she was named as the daughter of gentleman Cornelius Collett and his wife Ann.

 

 

 

 

18M5

Margaret Collett was born at Westerfield in 1770 and was baptised there on 19th October 1770, the only child of Cornelius Collett and his fourth wife Margaret Driver.  Margaret was 19 years old when her father died, by which time she was the only surviving child of Cornelius Collett, his three sons from a previous marriage having already passed away.  Under the terms of her father’s Will of 1789, Margaret and the heirs of her body were to receive all his real and personal estate and in default of these to his nephew and merchant banker Cornelius Collett (below) of Woodbridge and to William Goodwin of Earl Soham, in trust for sale and to divide the proceeds amongst the children of his late brother Anthony, the father of the aforementioned Cornelius.

 

 

 

During the following year, on 6th April 1790 at Westerfield, Margaret Collett married the Reverend John Davis Plestow clerk of St Mary le Tower in Ipswich, a fellow of St John’s College Oxford, who later became Rector of Harkstead in Suffolk.  Their marriage produced four children, one of whom was Catherine Margaret Plestow, who was baptised on 2nd September 1791, and another was Elizabeth Plestow who was born on 17th October 1792, and baptised on 23rd December 1792.  The other two children were a son and a daughter.

 

 

 

 

18M6

Anthony Collett was born at Eyke on 1st December 1744, and was baptised there on 27th January 1745, the eldest child of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  He married Catherine Trusson of Kelsale, near Saxmundham, who was the daughter of Gabriel Trusson of Kelsale, who was the High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1766, and his wife Catherine Bence.  Catherine Trusson was baptised at Kelsale on 14th February 1749, so it was one week after her twentieth birthday when she married Anthony Collett at Kelsale on 21st February 1769.  Once married the couple settled in the town of Walton, next to the port of Felixstowe, and it was while they were living there that all of their known children were born and where they were baptised.

 

 

 

As the eldest son of Anthony Collett of Eyke, Anthony was a major beneficiary under the terms of his father’s Will of 1783 in which he was referred to nine times.  The Will was proved in 1785.  (see Will in Legal Documents)

 

 

 

Anthony’s and Catherine’s eldest son Anthony Collett was educated at University College in Oxford and a note in the 1787-1793 University College Oxford records described the student’s father as ‘Anthony Collett of Walton in Suffolk’.  It would also appear that Anthony and Catherine lived all of their married life together at Walton, since it was there that Anthony Collett ‘esquire’ died on 31st July 1804 and was buried at Walton on 4th August 1804, at the age of 59.  He was followed by his wife who died fifteen years later, when she was buried there on 20th June 1819, aged 69.  At the time of her death she was described as ‘Catherine widow of Kelsale’ and her Will was proved on 20th July 1819.  The couple’s burial records at Walton read as follows: ”Anth Collett late of this par 31 Jul 1804 age 59, Cath his w only dau of Gabriel Trusson esq of Kelsale in this co. & Cath his w dau of Rev Tho Bence R. of Kelsale 20 Jun 1819 age 69”.

 

 

 

This is the second mention of the name Trusson in this family line (see Ref. 18J2).  The Trusson family had a long association with the Colletts.  In his Will of 1686, Thomas Trusson of Alderton makes reference to Elizabeth Collett, the wife of Cornelius Collett (Ref. 18J2).  See also Ref. 18O22, Ref. 18O51, Ref. 18P5, and Ref. 18Q2 for other connections with the Trusson name.

 

 

 

18N1

Anthony Collett

Born in 1769 at Walton

 

18N2

Thomas Collett

Born in 1771 at Walton

 

18N3

Catherine Collett

Born in 1773 at Walton

 

18N4

Charles Collett

Born in 1774 at Walton

 

18N5

Cornelius Collett

Born in 1786 at Walton

 

18N6

Cornelius Collett

Born in 1789 at Walton

 

 

 

 

18M7

Mary Collett was born at Eyke during September 1746, where she was baptised on 8th October 1746, the eldest daughter of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  It was originally thought that Mary was in her mid-thirties when she married William Wallis Mason on 5th May 1782 at Westcote, which lies midway between Stow-on-the-Wold in Gloucestershire and Burford in Oxfordshire.  However, new details provided by Doreen Howes in 2012 suggested that Mary and William, who may have been born in 1744, had four children by that date, although only one of them may have survived.  This would mean that they were most likely married in the early 1770s, and that the May date in 1782 was more likely to be the date on which Mary Mason nee Collett actually died.  This would also correspond with the known fact that her widowed husband William was remarried during the following years.  This would also then provide the reason why Mary was not named in her father’s Will which was written in June 1783.

 

 

 

Further information received from Avryll Sixtus in April 2013 confirms the following details of the life of Mary Collett and William Wallis Mason.  William was baptised at St Philip’s Church in Birmingham on 17th August 1742, the eldest son of John Wallis Mason and Sarah Richardson and it was on 29th January 1774 that he married Mary Collett the daughter of Anthony Collett.

 

 

 

The baptisms of the four children of William Wallis Mason and his wife Mary were conducted at St Philip’s Church in Birmingham, and they confirm the children were Mary Mason who was baptised on 24th May 1775, William Wallis Mason who was baptised on 25th October 1776, Elizabeth Mason who was baptised on 28th November 1777, who died on 3rd February 1778, and Charles Mason who was baptised on 3rd October 1778, who died on 30th November 1778, although an alternative source suggests that he died on the same day that he was baptised.  It is possible that the couple’s eldest daughter Mary also died in infancy, since William Wallis Mason junior was the only child referred to in the Will of William Wallis Mason senior following his death in 1805.

 

 

 

It was jeweller, businessman and merchant William Wallis Mason, born in 1776 and the son of Mary Collett, who later married Mary Ward at St Peter’s Cathedral in Sheffield on 5th July 1805.  Mary was the daughter of Joseph Ward and Sarah Aslin, and over twelve years she presented her husband with six children born at Leek Wootton, Beverley and East Barnet.  They were William Wallis Mason (born in 1806), Mary Mason (born in 1808), Sarah Collett Mason (born in 1810), Henry Ward Mason (born in 1812), Charlotte Mason, and Eliza Ann Mason (born in 1818).  It was their eldest son William Wallis Mason, who had his own pharmacy business in Manchester who married Mary Anne Poole in 1834, and it was their son James Collett Mason (born in 1853) who married Jessie Susette Collett (Ref. 18P38) in Argentina during 1887. 

 

 

 

William Wallis Mason (born in 1776) was living at Chorlton in Manchester at the time of the census in 1841 when he and Mary had two domestic servants and it was there that he died at the end of 1849, with his widow Mary surviving him by nine years.  The Will of William Wallis Mason was written in 1809 at Beverley in Yorkshire, in which his brother-in-law Thomas Asline Ward was one of the executors. 

 

 

 

Following the death of Mary Mason nee Collett on 5th May 1782, William Wallis Mason married Elizabeth Oliver on 13th February 1784 with whom he had a further nine children.  By marrying Elizabeth Oliver, William obtained land in Worcestershire as the result of a marriage settlement, also made during September 1782 between himself and the previous owner of the land, that being Elizabeth’s father.  Copies of the confirming document are held within Birmingham City Archives.  The land in question was partly made up of land originally forming Malvern Priory Demesne and lying to the south of the Priory, hence the name ‘Southfields’.

 

 

 

As regards the children of William Wallis Mason and his second wife Elizabeth, the parish registers for St Philip’s Church in Birmingham [now Birmingham Cathedral] contain the baptism records for their nine children who were born between 1783 and 1798, two of whom died in infancy.  The nine children were Sarah Mason (born in 1784), James Mason (born in 1785), Oliver Mason (born in 1787), Philip Mason (born in 1788), Charles Mason (born in 1790), Samuel Mason (born in 1791), George Mason (1794-1795), Mary Mason (born in 1796), and Frederick Mason (1798-1800).  

 

 

 

It would appear that only three of the seven surviving children were still living in 1842, and they were James Mason and Oliver Mason and their sister Mary Palmer who had married the Reverend Edward Palmer in 1833.  However, by the time the land at Malvern was put up for sale in 1846 only Oliver Mason and his sister Mary were still alive.

 

 

 

 

18M8

Cornelius Collett was baptised at Eyke on 27th March 1748, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  Like many of his siblings, Cornelius was not referred to in his father’s Will of June 1783, although that may have been due the arrangement between Cornelius’ father Anthony and his brother Cornelius Collett (Ref. 18L1), Lord of the Manor at Westerfield, whose Will six years later would benefit Cornelius and his surviving siblings, as detailed below.

 

 

 

Under the terms his uncle’s Will of 1789, his only surviving child, his daughter Margaret and her children were to receive all his real and personal estate and in default of these to his nephew and merchant banker Cornelius Collett of Woodbridge and to William Goodwin of Earl Soham, in trust for sale and to divide the proceeds amongst the children of his late brother Anthony, that is Cornelius and his siblings.

 

 

 

It was therefore sometime after that when Westerfield Manor was later sold to farmer Edward Edgar and his wife Barbara.  By 1820 the manor house was held by Mileson Edgar of Red House Park.  Ten years later it passed to his son Reverend Mileson Gery Edgar and, on his death in 1853, the manor was inherited by his nephew Captain Mileson Edgar of Red House Park.

 

 

 

It is of particular interest that Captain Mileson Edgar was the son of the Reverend Edward Raikes Edgar and his wife Mary Lynch Collett, the daughter of Charles Collett (Ref. 18N4) and Charlotte Lynch.

 

 

 

Cornelius Collett is known to have married Susanna Page who was born at Clapton around 1740, with whom he had five children.  Susanna Collett died at Woodbridge on 30th January 1818, and was buried at Eyke on 6th February 1818, aged 77.  Following the death of her husband’s death at Eyke ten years later on 20th November 1828, Cornelius’ Will was proved on 17th December 1828.  In his Will he was referred to as ‘Cornelius Collett, banker of Woodbridge in Suffolk’, although it was at Eyke that he was buried with his wife on 23rd November 1828 at the age of 80.  It may be of interest that in Woodbridge today, there is a thoroughfare with the name ‘Collett Walk’.  It might therefore be assumed that this was named as a tribute to Cornelius Collett.

 

 

 

18N7

Cornelius Collett

Born in 1774 at Woodbridge

 

18N8

Susanna Collett

Born in 1775 at Woodbridge

 

18N9

Cornelius Collett

Born in 1776 at Woodbridge

 

18N10

Lucy Collett

Born in 1777 at Woodbridge

 

18N11

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1778 at Woodbridge

 

18N12

Mary Collett

Born in 1780 at Woodbridge

 

 

 

 

18M9

Robert Collett was born at Eyke on 10th September 1749, where he was baptised on 18th September 1749, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  He married Jane Brice of Southampton on 1st January 1780 at St Michael’s Church in Southampton.  Robert Collett, Merchant of London, died there on 28th July 1824, aged 77, while his wife Jane died nine years after in 1833.  Robert was yet another child of Anthony Collett not to be mentioned in his Will of June 1783.

 

 

 

18N13

Robert Henry Collett

Born in 1781 in London

 

18N14

William Brice Collett

Born in 1785 in London

 

 

 

 

18M10

John Collett was born at Eyke in 1750, where he was baptised on 22nd October 1750, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  Tragically, when he was twenty-eight years old, he drowned off the coast of Ireland in 1778.

 

 

 

 

18M11

Margaret Collett was born at Eyke in 1752, and was baptised there on 15th March 1752, the daughter of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  Like some of her other siblings, Margaret was not mentioned in her father Anthony’s Will of 1783, which may indicate that she was already financially stable by then, as a result of her two marriages.  There is some confusion about the two marriages of Margaret Collett, although it is known that she married (1) Thomas Ward of Dedham and (2) John Russell of Woodbridge, but not necessarily in that order.  The marriage to Thomas Ward took place at Eyke on 7th June 1776.  Margaret died at Grundisburgh on 16th February 1812, where she was also buried.

 

 

 

 

18M13

Elizabeth Collett was born at Eyke on 8th March 1754 and was baptised there on 16th May 1754, the daughter of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  She was not a direct beneficiary under the terms of her father’s Will of 1783, although one thousand pounds was bequeathed to any future lawful issue that she might ever have that survived beyond the age of twenty-one.  Eight years after the death of her father Anthony, Elizabeth Collett married Doctor John Ebden on 29th October 1793 at Woodbridge.  John was born at Sisland in Norfolk on 21st January 1750 and was the youngest of the seven children of William Ebden and Honour (Honoria) Bardwell.  It was also at Sisland that he was baptised privately on 2nd February 1751, and again publicly on 21st February 1751.

 

 

 

The marriage to Elizabeth Collett was the second for John, he having previously married Sarah Norman on 7th January 1783.  Sarah, who was baptised on 14th June 1752 at St Cross South Elmham, died at Loddon in Norfolk on 10th January 1793.  That first marriage for John resulted in five children, with his second marriage to Elizabeth producing a further three children, all eight having been born at Loddon.

 

 

 

As a young man John was a surgeon in the North American colonies before serving with the British Army in the American War of Independence, during which he was captured.  However, he was released on parole to continue his work as a surgeon.  After 4th July 1776 John returned to England and took up the position of Surgeon to His Majesty’s Hospital for Sick and Wounded Soldiers at Plymouth.  With his brother Thomas, Surgeon of Loddon, he later instituted "a convenient house at Loddon for the receipt of lunatic patients, whose occasional confinement will be softened by every care and attention that humanity can dictate".  That was Loddon House, on Beccles Road in Loddon, which was built in 1716.  However, it was only in 1827 that it was licenced as an asylum ‘for 25 lunatics’ and that only lasted until 1845 when it was eventually closed down.

 

 

 

The eldest of Elizabeth’s and John’s three children was James Collett Ebden who was born at Loddon on 16th August 1794.  On 2nd September 1828 he married Elizabeth Wylde (1802-1880) at St Michael’s Church, Millbrook in Bedfordshire.  She was the daughter of Elizabeth Powney and Captain Sydenham Teast Wylde adjutant of the Somerset Yeomanry who was killed aged 24 when he was thrown from his horse while riding home from camp. 

James Collett Ebden (pictured right) was educated at Stowmarket and became an Anglican Deacon in 1817 and a Priest in 1818.  He is known to have been the tutor to two of the Duke of Wellington’s great nephews and was the headmaster at Ipswich Grammar School from 1832 to 1838.  The Reverend James Collett Ebden died at Great Stukeley near Huntingdon on 15th February 1884, and his Will made on 4th November 1880, was proved on 15th July 1884.

 

 

 

Tragically his son, Samuel Collett Ebden, who was born at Ipswich on 19th February 1837, died on 3rd February 1849 at St Giles in Northampton as a result of earlier injuries sustained when he fell from an upstairs window of his father’s home at The Vicarage in Great Stukeley. 

 

James Collett Ebden was 89 when he died.  He was a Fellow of Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge, but migrated to Trinity Hall as Fellow and Tutor.  He and Elizabeth had ten children, poor Samuel was the sixth, more importantly the third was Richard Powney Ebden, CB, Chief Clerk of the Colonial Office, the seventh was Francis Thomas Ebden, Indian Army Colonel and the ninth Edward James Ebden, ICS Commissioner, Bombay Presidency

 

 

 

Later in their life, Elizabeth and John Ebden and their family moved to Haughley, just north-west of Stowmarket, where they lived at Fir Tree House.  And it was there that John died on 4th September 1834 followed by Elizabeth on 23rd April 1842, both of them being buried at Haughley in Suffolk.  John Ebden’s Will was made less than a week before his death and was dated 29th August 1834, and was proved on 26th September 1834.

 

 

 

John’s brother and fellow surgeon Doctor Thomas Ebden is of interest for other reasons.  He was born at Cringleford on 5th September 1743 and was baptised there six days later at St Peters Church on 11th September.  He married (1) Sarah Norman’s sister, but she died without issue.  Thomas then married (2) Mary Grimmer in 1785, the marriage producing eight children for the couple, although their first two sons died in infancy.  Thomas Ebden was buried at St Andrews Church in Barton Bendish on 4th December 1808 and his Will, made on 3rd June 1802 was proved at Norwich on 24th May 1810.

 

 

 

His seventh child was Sophia Ebden who was born at Barton Bendish on 12th July 1799.  She married James Collett (Ref. 18N23) in 1830, but tragically died in January 1836 although not before presenting James with a daughter Fanny Collett, and a son Ebden Collett.

 

 

 

James Collett was a nephew of Elizabeth Collett, he being the son of her brother Samuel Collett (below). 

 

 

 

All of the original information relating to the Ebden family has been kindly supplied by Edward Anthony Maitland Ebden of Monmouthshire in Wales who was born at Kensington in London on 20th December 1955.  Sadly Edward’s older brother William Nicholas Collett Ebden died in San Diego on 14th August 1973, three months before his twentieth birthday, following which he was buried at Eynsford in Kent.  During the years since the receipt of that initial information from Edward, other snippets of information have been gratefully received from Bill Ebden, Jack Ebden, and Edward Ebden himself.

 

 

 

 

18M14

William Collett was baptised at Eyke on 30th November 1755, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  He was educated at Merton College in Oxford where he matriculated on 6th February 1783 aged 26.  The college record confirmed that he was the son of Anthony Collett of Eyke.  William was one of the three major beneficiaries in the 1783 Will of his father who died in 1785, the other two being his mother Mary and his eldest brother Anthony (above).

 

 

 

During the year following his matriculation, William Collett married Anna Carthew of Woodbridge on 13th July 1784.  She was the daughter of the Reverend Thomas Carthew, of Woodbridge Abbey, and his wife Elizabeth Morden, the first of his four wives.  Elizabeth was the daughter of the Rev Thomas Morden, who was the brother of Sir William Morden Harbord, and it was the Morden family connection that later helped secure the post of Chaplain at Morden College in Blackheath for the only son of William Collett, his namesake William Collett.  The six known children of William and Anna Collett were all born and baptised at All Saints Church in Swanton Morley.

 

 

 

Later in his life William Collett became the Rector of Swanton Morley in Norfolk and died on 20th September 1825 at the age of 69.  Anna died at Clapham in Surrey on 27th December 1830 aged 70, where she was buried on 31st December 1830.  The order of the birth of their children below is an approximate assumption based purely on the dates that they were married, since the exact dates that they were born have not been established at this time.  Today, in All Saints Church in Swanton Morley there is a large marble memorial plaque over the doorway to the Vestry to William Collett and his family.  This says:

 

 

 

“Sacred to the Memory of The Rev. William Collett who died September 20th 1825 in the 70th year of his age.  During a period of more than 41 years he resided and officiated as the Minister of this Parish with Worthing, having been appointed Curate in 1784 and Rector in 1808.

 

Charlotte Collett died Feb 27th 1805 aged 18 years

Anna Collett died Nov 16th 1806 aged 21 years

 

Anna his widow, daughter of Rev Thomas Carthew of Woodbridge Abbey Suffolk

Died 24th Dec 1830 aged 70 years

She was buried with her husband and their above named children in the vault

at the NE corner of the Church yard”

 

 

 

Although not confirmed, some sources believe William and Anna had another daughter Sarah Collett, now added below.  However, unlike all of their other children, no baptism record for Sarah has been found, which places doubt on her being the child of William and Anna.  That Sarah or Sara Collett was originally believed to have married General George Whitmore, although that has now been disapproved thanks to new details received from Margaret Davison.  What is interesting in the details provided by Margaret is that William and Anna’s daughter Sophie had a daughter Sarah who did marry a member of the Whitmore family.

 

 

 

18N15

Anna Collett

Born in 1785 at Swanton Morley

 

18N16

Charlotte Collett

Born in 1787 at Swanton Morley

 

18N17

Sophia Collett

Born in 1788 at Swanton Morley

 

18N18

Mary Collett

Born in 1789 at Swanton Morley

 

18N19

Frances Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1792 at Swanton Morley

 

18N20

Sarah Collett – not confirmed

Born in 1794 at Swanton Morley

 

18N21

William Collett

Born in 1796 at Swanton Morley

 

 

 

 

18M15

Nathaniel Collett was born at Eyke during August 1757, where he was baptised on 20th August 1757, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  Whilst he was not a direct beneficiary under the terms of his father’s Will, one thousand pounds was bequeathed to any future lawful issue that he might ever have, that survived beyond the age of twenty-one.

 

 

 

 

18M16

Anne Collett was baptised at Eyke on 27th July 1759, the youngest daughter of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  It was also at Eyke that Anne later married surgeon William Jones of Woodbridge on 22nd September 1793.  Anne was yet another sibling who was not mentioned in the Will of her father, which was written in 1783.

 

 

 

 

18M17

Woodthorpe Collett was born at Eyke where he was baptised on 16th December 1762, the son of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  Just like his brother Nathaniel (above), Woodthorpe was also mentioned in his father’s Will as receiving one thousand pounds towards payment of any future lawful issue that he might ever have, should he survive beyond the age of twenty-one.

 

 

 

He was married twice during his life, the first time to (1) Charlotte Spurling, the daughter of John Spurling esquire of Grundisburgh, whom he married at Burgh during July 1794, and with whom he had two children before Charlotte’s untimely death at Grundisburgh on 12th December 1796, following which she was buried there on 19th December 1796.  Eighteen months later, on 24th July 1798, Woodthorpe married (2) Letitia Skinner, the daughter of Francis Skinner of Ipswich, and that marriage produced a second daughter for Woodthorpe.

 

 

 

Woodthorpe Collett was 71 when he died at Clopton, near Grundisburgh, on 23rd December 1833, following which he was buried at Grundisburgh on 29th December 1833.  His wife Letitia Collett had already died at Clopton by then, she having passed away on 10th May 1830, and it was recorded that Latitia Collett, age 69, at Grundisburgh on 15th May 1830.

 

 

 

18N22

Woodthorpe Collett

Born in 1795 at Grundisburgh

 

18N23

Charlotte Collett

Born in 1796 at Grundisburgh

 

18N24

Letitia Mary Collett

Born after 1798 at Grundisburgh

 

 

 

 

18M18

Samuel Collett was born at Eyke, and it was there that he was baptised on 10th April 1764, the youngest child of Anthony Collett and Mary May.  He was just approaching 21 years of age when his father died in 1785.  In his father’s Will, Samuel was named as the youngest son, but was not a major beneficiary although, like his two brothers Nathaniel and Woodthorpe (above), one thousand pounds was bequeathed to him for any future lawful issue that he might ever have, if he survived beyond the age of twenty-one.

 

 

 

Samuel was nearly 30 on 12th September 1793 when he married Sarah Day, the daughter of John Day of St John’s, although there is speculation that Sarah may have been his second wife.  It was nearly twelve years after they were married that Sarah presented Samuel with their only known child.  Samuel Collett of Foxhall died on 17th March 1825 at the age of 60, following which he was buried in the churchyard at Blyford, midway between Halesworth and Southwold.  His widow survived him by almost twenty years, during which time she had left Blyford to settle in Hethersett, near Norwich, where Sarah Collett died on 18th October 1844, at the age of 73.

 

 

 

18N25

James Collett

Born in 1805

 

 

 

 

18M22

William Collett was born at Stradbroke where he was baptised on 5th February 1759, the eldest son of Samuel Collett and Lucy Cowper.  New information kindly provided by Liz Whittaker in April 2010 revealed that William first married (1) Ann Wood on 14th September 1784, but with no issue.  According to the Suffolk Register of Marriages, Ann Wood was a widow.  The records also show that, as Anna Tharlow, she married John Wood at Fressingfield on 7th February 1780.  It was more recent information, provided by Robert Porter that indicated Ann Wood was formerly Anna Tharlow.  This new information also stated that she died at Fressingfield, where she was buried on 15th June 1786, less than two years after she had married William Collett.

 

 

 

Following the death of his first wife, William would have been around 32 when he married (2) Ann Flint at Fressingfield on 10th October 1791.  The record of that marriage included the letter W after his name, confirming his status as a widower.  Ann was much younger than William, having been born around at 1770.  All of William’s and Ann’s first seven children were born while the family was living at Fressingfield in Suffolk, which lies just four miles south of county boundary with Norfolk, while no baptism record for their eighth child has yet been found.  Ann Collett died at Fressingfield, where she was buried on 21st May 1837, aged 71.  Seven months later William Collett was described as the father of the groom and a labourer on the marriage certificate for his eldest son and widower William Collett, on the occasion of his second marriage to Mary Ann Dye at Poringland Magna, near Norwich in December 1837.

 

 

 

According to the census in June 1841, and following the death of his wife, William was living at Barlow Green in Stradbroke with the family of John and Phillace (Phyllis) Sayer when he had a rounded age of 85 and was still apparently working as an agricultural labourer.  The maiden name of Phyllis Sayer was Collett, so she was more than like the youngest child of William Collett and Ann Flint.  However, less than five months later Phyllis Sayer nee Collett died at Stradbroke and it may have been from that time that William lived in the workhouse.  What is known for sure is that William Collett died at the age of 88 on 3rd April 1846 at Union House in Shipmeadow near Beccles in Suffolk.  The cause of death was simply given as ‘old age’, while the informant was the Master of the Union House.  And it was also at Shipmeadow that he was buried on 7th April 1846.

 

 

 

18N26

William Collett

Born in 1793 at Fressingfield

 

18N27

Henry Collett

Born in 1795 at Fressingfield

 

18N28

Charles Collett

Born in 1799 at Fressingfield

 

18N29

Samuel Collett

Born in 1801 at Fressingfield

 

18N30

Benjamin Collett

Born in 1803 at Fressingfield

 

18N31

John Collett

Born in 1805 at Fressingfield

 

18N32

Lucy Collett

Born in 1807 at Fressingfield

 

18N33

Phyllis Collett

Born in 1810 at Fressingfield

 

 

 

 

18M23

Charles Collett was baptised at Stradbroke on 28th November 1760, the son of Samuel and Lucy Collett.  It seems highly likely that he was the Charles Collett who married Ann Taylor at Halesworth on 30th March 1786.

 

 

 

 

18M24

John Collett was born at Stradbroke, where he was baptised on 20th January 1762, the son of Samuel and Lucy Collett.  Sadly just three months later he died and was buried there on 17th April 1762, when he was described as John Collet (sic), infant.

 

 

 

 

18M26

John Collett was baptised at Stradbroke on 16th March 1765, and was the youngest surviving son of Samuel Collett and Lucy Cowper.  He married Elizabeth Thurlow who was baptised in 1763 at Wingfield, where the couple’s first child was born, before the family settled in Saxmundham where their remaining children were all born.  It is possible, although not proved, that Elizabeth Thurlow may have been a sister or some other relative of Anna Tharlow, the first wife of John’s older brother William Collett (above).  Tragedy struck the young family in 1803 when John Collett was killed after falling from a tree on 7th January 1803, although his age was stated as being 35, when actually he was around 38.

 

 

 

In 1841 there were two widows by the name of Elizabeth Collett still living in Saxmundham, one was 70 and the other was 82, one of which was undoubtedly the widow of John Collett.  It has now been confirmed that John and Elizabeth did have more children than was originally thought, and that it was their two youngest sons, Charles and William who were born at Saxmundham, who feature in Part 30 – The Suffolk & Norfolk Line.

 

 

 

18N34

John Collett

Born in 1785 at Wingfield

 

18N35

Ann Collett

Born in 1791 at Saxmundham

 

18N36

Hannah Collett

Born in 1793 at Saxmundham

 

18N37

Charles Collett

Born in 1795 at Saxmundham

 

18N38

William Collett

Born in 1798 at Saxmundham

 

 

 

 

18M27

Lucy Collett was born at Stradbroke where she was baptised on 2nd May 1766, the daughter of Samuel and Lucy Collett.  It was also at Stradbroke that she was buried on 16th December 1781, when she was recorded as Lucy Collet age 15.

 

 

 

 

18M28

Elizabeth Collett was born at Stradbroke and was baptised there on 13th August 1767, the daughter of Samuel and Lucy Collett.  Around three months later she died and was buried at Stradbroke on 26th November 1767, when her surname was spelt using a single t.

 

 

 

 

18M29

Martha Collett was born at Stradbroke where she was baptised on 13th August 1769.  Curiously upon her death she was the only child in the tragic family of Samuel and Lucy Collett whose name was correctly spelt within the parish register when she was buried at Stradbroke on 1st July 1770.

 

 

 

 

18M30

Philologus Collett was born at Stradbroke and it was there that he was baptised on 23rd October 1770, the son of Samuel and Lucy Collett.  Sadly he was ten years old when he was buried at Stradbroke on 16th November 1780, as confirmed by the parish register under the name of Collet (sic).

 

 

 

 

18M31

Anthony Collett was born at Stradbroke where he was baptised on 28th October 1771, the last child of Samuel Collett and his wife Lucy Cowper.  He never reached his fourth birthday since he died during February 1775 and was buried at Stradbroke on 21st February 1775 as Anthony Collet, infant.

 

 

 

 

18M35

Hannah Collett was born at Wilby where she was baptised on 20th September 1772, the eldest child of William Collett and his first wife Hannah Mills.  Hannah never married, although she gave birth to a base-born son who was also baptised at Wilby when she was 20 years old.  It is possible the child was already a couple of years old by then according to one unconfirmed source.  Tragically it was only nine years later that she died at Wilby, where the parish register recorded the burial of Hannah Collet (sic) on 17th July 1801 at the age of 27 (sic).

 

 

 

18N39

William Collett

Baptised on 10.09.1792 at Wilby

 

 

 

 

18M36

William Collett was born at Wilby where he was baptised on 5th June 1775, the second son of William Collett and Hannah Mills.  It was also at Wilby that William married Dinah Lockwood on 23rd December 1798.  Dinah was baptised at Wilby on 4th August 1776, the daughter of Evans Lockwood and Jemima Rumsey.  She was also the sister of Evans Lockwood who married William’s sister Ann Collett (below).  All of the children of William Collett and Dinah Lockwood were born and baptised at Wilby.  William and Dinah were residing in Wilby in 1841 when they were both 65, although Dinah’s age was incorrectly recorded as 55.  Living there with them was their unmarried son John Collett, who was 25.  William Collett died during the next decade since his widow was still living at Wilby within the Hoxne & Dennington registration district on the day of the census in 1851.  Dinah Collet (sic), age 77, died four years later during 1855.

 

 

 

18N40

Jemima Collett              twin

Born in 1800 at Wilby

 

18N41

Dinah Collett                 twin

Born in 1800 at Wilby

 

18N42

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1802 at Wilby

 

18N43

Dinah Collett

Born in 1804 at Wilby

 

18N44

Jemima Collett

Born in 1807 at Wilby

 

18N45

William Collett

Born in 1809 at Wilby

 

18N46

John Collett

Born in 1814 at Wilby

 

18N47

James Collett

Born in 1817 at Wilby

 

 

 

 

18M37

Ann Collett was born at Wilby and was baptised there on 30th March 1777.  Three years after her brother William (above) had married Dinah Lockwood, Ann Collett married her brother Evans Lockwood at Wilby on 9th November 1801.  Evans was the son of Evans Lockwood and Jemima Rumsey, and was baptised at Wilby on 16th October 1763.  Evans Lockwood was elected the Clerk of Wilby Parish Council on 15th February 1796.  Both Ann and Evans were buried at Wilby, Ann on 26th May 1842, and Evans on 7th May 1844.  It is likely that the couple had more than the one child mentioned here, but that child, Hezekiah Lockwood who was born at Wilby in 1806, is specifically referred to because he later married his cousin Ann Collett, the eldest daughter of John Collett (below).

 

 

 

 

18M38

Elizabeth Collett was born at Wilby in 1779, and it was there that she was baptised on 27th July 1800, the daughter of William Collett and his first wife Hannah Mills.

 

 

 

 

18M39

JOHN COLLETT was born at Wilby where he was baptised on 26th January 1783, the youngest son of William Collett and Hannah Mills.  He was a tailor in Brundish and he married Susan Watling on 15th September 1803 at Tannington near Framlingham.  Susan was born in 1769 and was the daughter of George Watling and Susan Jessop.  All of their children were born and baptised at Wilby, except their eldest daughter Ann Collett who was born at Wetheringsett. 

 

 

 

Susan Collett nee Watling was buried at Wilby on 5th August 1838, so by the time of the census in 1841 widow John Collett was 55, and had living with him at Wilby his daughters Frances, age 25, and Hannah, age 20.  After a further ten years John was still residing in Wilby at the age of 65, with just his daughter Fanny Collett, age 35, for company.  It was five years later that John Collett died at Wilby, where he was buried on 30th April 1856. 

 

 

 

18N48

Ann Collett

Baptised on 24.06.1804 at Wetheringsett

 

18N49

ROBERT COLLETT

Baptised on 23.03.1806 at Wilby

 

18N50

Harriet Collett

Baptised on 14.02.1808 at Wilby

 

18N51

Frances Collett

Baptised on 24.06.1810 at Wilby

 

18N52

Charity Collett               twin

Baptised on 21.06.1813 at Wilby

 

18N53

Susan Collett                 twin

Baptised on 21.06.1813 at Wilby

 

18N54

Hannah Collett

Baptised on 16.07.1815 at Wilby

 

 

 

 

18N1

Anthony Collett was born at Walton near Felixstowe in 1769, where he was baptised on 6th April 1770, the eldest son of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  He attended University College at Oxford where he matriculated on 13th February 1787.  The college records also confirmed that he was the eldest son of Anthony Collett of Walton in Suffolk.  It was there that he gained a Bachelor of Arts degree on 17th December 1790, and a little later his Master of Arts on 28th June 1793.  He was presented by Lord Huntingfield in 1800 and to Heveningham in Suffolk by the Lord Chancellor in 1803, the latter making him the Rector of Heveningham.

 

 

 

He married Anne Rachel Curtis before the turn of the century and was later the incumbent at Heveningham Hall.  In 1813 Anthony paid out £420 for a modest two-up, two-down house in Ubbeston, about one mile from Heveningham, that was built in 1776 by Robert Baldry.  That house later became The Old Rectory and is still in existence today with a stone sill that records the year built and Baldry’s initials.  Baldry died in 1806, but not before he had rebuilt Heveningham Hall which was vacated by Anthony Collett in 1813.

 

 

 

Anthony was a wealthy man, owning 600 acres of land and a year after buying the modest two-up two-down property he extended the building at the eastern end to accommodate his growing family.  The family remained living in the house until 1826, when it was passed to eldest son Anthony.  It was around that time, that it would appear Anthony Collett senior and his wife Anne left Ubbeston and moved, the ten miles east, to Aldringham near Leiston.  Their son Anthony did not stay long living in the house at Ubbeston, but moved to Bury St Edmunds, at which time the house was leased to local farmer Simon Smyth and his wife Phoebe and their two teenage children.  By 1841 the house had been further extended at the back to accommodate two live-in servants. 

 

 

 

Three years prior to that date Anthony Collett senior had died at Heveningham during February in 1838, and it was there also that he was buried on 26th February 1838.  The parish register record that he 68 and a rector.  An article in the Gentleman’s Magazine reported his death as follows:  February 27th at Leamington aged 67, the Reverend Anthony Collett of Kelsale House in Suffolk, an acting magistrate of that county, Rector of Heveningham and perpetual curate of Aldringham-with-Thorpe(ness) and Great Linsted.

 

 

 

Anthony’s Will was proved on 22nd May 1838 and was listed as the Will of ‘Reverend Anthony Collett, Rector, and Clerk of Heveningham in Suffolk’.  Sometime following the death of her husband his widow moved to Bury St Edmunds, where Anne Rachel Collett was living when she died in March 1849.  However, she was buried with her husband at Heveningham on 20th March 1849, aged 73.  Her Will was proved on 2nd May 1849 and was recorded as the Will of ‘Anne Rachel Collett widow of Heveningham’.

 

 

 

Less than three years before he died, on 22nd December 1835, the Reverend Anthony Collett, magistrate, had tried unsuccessfully to persuade a mob of 200 rioters at Bulcamp Workhouse near Blythburgh to disperse.  In the end he was forced to read them the Riot Act which was more successful, although they threatened to return later.  All of this was reported in a letter from Harry White, Clerk to the Guardians of the Blything Poor Law Union, to the Poor Law Commission, enclosing minutes of the meeting of the board of guardians of the Blything Poor Law Union, and resolutions relating to mob control.  The full story was told in Collett Newsletter No. 64, available upon request.

 

 

 

18O1

Anthony Collett

Born in 1800 at Heveningham

 

18O2

Anne Collett

Born in 1802 at Heveningham

 

18O3

Catherine Charlotte Collett

Born in 1805 at Heveningham

 

18O4

William Collett

Born in 1812 at Heveningham

 

 

 

 

18N2

Thomas Collett was born at Walton in 1771 and was baptised there on 7th July 1771, the son of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  He married Margaret Bushell with whom he had five children.  It is very likely that the children were all born at Minster-in-Thanet to the west of Ramsgate in Kent, since it was there, in the Church of St Mary, that they were all baptised within a few days of their birth.  Thomas Collett was known as ‘Thomas of Ringleton’ (in Kent) and towards the end of his life he lived at Woodnesborough near Sandwich in Kent, where he died in 1845 at the age of 73.  His wife Margaret died in 1838.  Whilst Ringleton does not appear to be a hamlet or a village settlement, it is possible that it is a reference to Ringleton Manor, which is situated just to the north-west of Woodnesborough.

 

 

 

18O5

Margaret Collett

Born in 1804 at Minister-in-Thanet

 

18O6

Thomas Collett

Born in 1805 at Minister-in-Thanet

 

18O7

George Collett

Born in 1806 at Minister-in-Thanet

 

18O8

Mary Collett

Born in 1808 at Minister-in-Thanet

 

18O9

Catherine Collett

Born in 1810 at Minister-in-Thanet

 

 

 

 

18N3

Catherine Collett was born at Walton in 1773 and it was there that she was baptised on 16th April 1773, the only daughter of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  Catherine married Henry Pett Hannam of Northbourne near Deal in Kent, at Walton on 20th September 1797.  Once married Catherine and Henry settled in Northbourne where their children were born.  Only two are listed below, although there may have been others.  The couple’s eldest daughter Catherine died on 21st January 1834, while her mother Catherine Hannam nee Collett died twenty years later on 5th December 1854.

 

 

 

18O10

Catherine Ann Hannam

Born on 12.12.1799 at Northbourne, Kent

 

18O11

Harriet Pett Hannam – see Ref. 18O1

Born on 20.07.1802 at Northbourne, Kent

 

 

 

 

18N4

Charles Collett was born at Walton in 1774 where he was baptised on 3rd November 1774, the son of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  Charles married (1) Charlotte Lynch at Walton-cum-Felixstowe in 1801.  During their short married life Charlotte presented Charles with six children before she died at the end of 1813, possibly during the birth of the sixth child.  All of their children were born and baptised at Walton in Felixstowe, where Charlotte Collett died on 27th December 1813 and was buried on 1st January 1814 at the age of just 37.

 

 

 

Within the Walton burial records is the following poorly written entry:  ”Ch Altar tomb palisaded Charlotte w of Cha Collett 27 Dec 1813 age 37, 3 of their sons d. inf. Cha Collett 16 Aug 1842 age 67, Cath their 2nd dau w of Hen.......”.  Thereafter the handwriting is very difficult to read.

 

 

 

It was during the year following the death of his wife that Charles Collett married (2) Elizabeth Harmsworth at Walton in 1814.  That second marriage produced a sixth child for Charles, who was also baptised at Walton.  Although it would appear that all of Charles’ children may have been born at Walton, by June 1841 the family was living at Woodbridge near Ipswich.  The census at that time recorded Charles Collett as being 65, while his wife Elizabeth was 60.  Living with the couple were three of their unmarried children.  They were son James who was 30, son William who was 20, and daughter Elizabeth who was 25.  All adult ages in that first full national census were rounded to the nearest 5 and 10 years.

 

 

 

Charles’ younger brother Cornelius Collett (below) had died during the months prior to 1841 and that may have been the reason why his youngest son Trusson Collett was staying with Charles and Elizabeth at Woodbridge.  Charles Collett died at Woodbridge on 16th August 1842 and was buried at Walton on 24th August 1842 aged 67, when he referred to as Charles Collett of Walton.  It was nine years after the death of her husband that Elizabeth Collett nee Harmsworth died at Bury St Edmunds during the last week of September, following which she was buried at Stanningfield on 27th September 1851, aged 75.  By that time in his life it was her only son William Collett who was the Curate at Stanningfield, and it was very likely William who conducted his mother’s funeral service.

 

 

 

18O12

Mary Lynch Collett

Born in 1807 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

 

18O13

Catherine Collett

Born in 1807 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

 

18O14

Charlotte Collett

Born in 1809 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

 

18O15

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1810 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

 

18O16

Charles Lynch Collett

Born in 1811 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

 

18O17

Charles Collett

Born in 1813 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

 

The only child of Charles Collett and his second wife Elizabeth Harmsworth was:

 

18O18

William Collett

Born in 1818 at Walton-cum-Felixstowe

 

 

 

 

18N5

Cornelius Collett was born at Walton in 1786 and was baptised there on 30th March 1787, the son of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  However, it would appear that he must have suffered an infant death, since the next child born to Anthony and Catherine was also given the name Cornelius.  Curiously though, while there are two baptism records for Cornelius Collett, both the sons of Anthony and Catherine, there is no burial record for a Cornelius between the two dates.  Furthermore, upon the death of Cornelius Collett (below), his date of birth was given as the date of the baptism of the first of the two Cornelius.  So was there only one of them, and could he have been baptised twice, just two years apart.  Alternatively if there was only one, the first ‘baptism date’ may have been his birth date.

 

 

 

 

18N6

Cornelius Collett was born at Walton shortly after the death of his brother of the same name in 1787, and it was there also that he was baptised on 2nd March 1789, the youngest and last child of Anthony Collett and Catherine Trusson.  Cornelius Collett was around 35 years old when he married Amelia Daniel on 14th May 1822, the wedding taking place at Falkenham in Suffolk on Amelia’s twenty-eighth birthday.  Amelia was the daughter of Robert Daniel and his wife Alice Woodruffe, and was baptised at Falkenham near Felixstowe on 19th May 1794.  Following their marriage, Cornelius and Amelia initially settled in Falkenham, where their first child was born, before the family moved north to Beverley.

 

 

 

During his life he was referred to as ‘Cornelius Collett of Beverley’ in Yorkshire, and it was there where three of the couple’s four sons were born.  Cornelius Collett died at Beverley on 30th March 1840, following which the Northern Star and Leeds General Advertiser published on 4th April 1840 included the following death notice for him.  "On Monday last at his house in Beverley, Cornelius Collett, Esq.  He was born 30 March 1787 and died 30 March 1840, having just lived to complete his 53rd year."  It is very interesting that the stated date of his birth was actually the baptism date for his brother.  See the notes above on this subject.

 

 

 

The first national census in June 1841 recorded Amelia Collett, age 45 and a widow, living at Beverley in the East Riding of Yorkshire with just three of her four sons.  Her three sons were listed as Charles Collett and Samuel Collett, both aged 15, and Daniel Collett who was 12.  At that same time Amelia’s youngest son Trusson Collett, who was nine years old, was staying with his uncle Charles Collett (above) at Woodbridge.  Twenty years after the death of Cornelius Collett an item appeared in The Times newspaper on 7th September 1860.  The article reported that “Trusson, youngest son of the late Cornelius Collett Esquire of Beverley, had married Elizabeth Charlotte Collett”.  There was also a similar notice published in the Ipswich Journal on 8th September.

 

 

 

Sometime later Amelia left Beverley when she moved to London, and was living in the Kensington district of the city in 1861 at the age of 66.  Within the following decade she moved again, that time to Isleworth, where she was joined by her unmarried son Samuel.  In the census of 1871 Amelia was 76 and Samuel was 43 (sic).  At the time of the death of Amelia Collett nee Daniel on 3rd September 1880, age the age of 86, she was recorded as being of Clare Lodge, Spring Grove in Isleworth.  However, it was at Ramsey near Harwich in Essex where she was buried six days later on 9th September, where a headstone for her mother’s Woodruffe family refers to her as the relict of Cornelius Collett of Beverley.

 

 

 

In addition to the burial of many members of the Woodruffe family, Ramsey’s churchyard also contains a record of the burial of William Woodthorpe, who died on 15th September 1806 at the age of 55.  He was the husband of Judith Woodthorpe who died on 17th April 1792 aged 38 years and the son-in-law of John Woodruffe (Judith’s father) who died on 2nd April 1788 aged 65, whose wife was Judith Woodruffe who died on 11th March 1808 aged 80.

 

 

 

18O19

Charles Collett

Born in 1823 at Falkenham, Suffolk

 

18O20

Samuel Collett

Born in 1824 at Beverley, Yorkshire

 

18O21

Daniel Collett

Born in 1828 at Beverley, Yorkshire

 

18O22

Trusson Collett

Born in 1831 at Beverley, Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

18N7

Cornelius Collett was born at Woodbridge in 1774, where he was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 20th July 1774, the eldest son of Cornelius Collett and Susanna Page.  Tragically, it was less than a week later that baby Cornelius Collett was buried there on 25th July 1774.

 

 

 

 

18N8

Susanna Collett was born at Woodbridge around June 1775, and was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 2nd July 1775, the eldest daughter of Cornelius Collett and Susanna Page.  She later married attorney Rayner Cox, who was born at Harwich.  Sadly the marriage only endured for a few years when, at the age of 25, Susanna Cox died in Hertfordshire, where she was buried on 8th October 1799.

 

 

 

 

18N9

Cornelius Collett was born at Woodbridge in 1776, where he was baptised at St Mary’s Church on 24th August 1776, the second son of Cornelius Collett and Susanna Page.  He was named after his older brother of the same name, who had died just two years earlier.  By 1797 he was Lieutenant Cornelius Collett of the Royal Navy.  Upon his death, he was buried at Woodbridge.

 

 

 

 

18N10

Lucy Collett was born at Woodbridge in 1777.  It was also there that she was baptised on 9th January 1778, the daughter of Cornelius and Susanna Collett, although sadly she died not long after that while still an infant.

 

 

 

 

18N11

Elizabeth Collett was born at Woodbridge, where she was baptised on 11th December 1778, the daughter of Cornelius Collett and Susanna Page.  She later married John Gurling (Girling) who worked at The Customs House in London, and they had a son.  The only other known fact about Elizabeth is that she died at Ingatestone (Inggleston) in Essex, where she was buried.  It may be of interest that William Collett (Ref. 18L38) married his second wife Mary Girling at Wilby in 1801.  Whether she was related in some way to john Girling is not known at this time.

 

 

 

 

18N12

Mary Collett was born at Woodbridge during July 1780, the youngest child of Cornelius Collett and Susanna Page, and was baptised at St Mary’s Church in Woodbridge on 25th July 1780.  She was 21 when she married William Whincosp at Woodbridge on 22nd March 1802.  William Whincosp of Bridfield was a surgeon.

 

 

 

 

18N13

Robert Henry Collett was born in London on 9th April 1781 and was baptised at All Hallows Church in Bread Street on 3rd may 1781, the eldest son of Robert Collett and his wife Jane Brice.  He was educated at Fulham School in London by Mr Owen, and from there he entered Trinity College in Cambridge on 4th July 1798 at the age of 18.  The university records confirm he was the son of Robert Collett of London, and that he was born in 1782.  He matriculated in 1799 and obtained his BA in 1803, followed three years later by his MA in 1806.  He married Frances Meyler Smith, the daughter of Henry and Frances Smith of Peckham House in Camberwell, Surrey, who was baptised on 6th April 1786 Hartburn in Northumberland.  The marriage took place at St Giles Church in Camberwell on 27th October 1809, following which the couple initially lived at Little Ilford in Essex, where their first nine children were born, before moving to Kent where their last two known children were born.

 

 

 

It may also be of interest that Robert’s son William Lloyd Collett married Frances Harriett Smith, the daughter of one Henry Smith, who may well have been a relative of Robert’s wife.  Frances Meyler Smith, who was born in 1790, may have been almost ten years younger than her husband and lived on for almost another twenty years after his death, before she passed away on 26th August 1857.  Robert Henry Collett died at Brighton on 22nd July 1838 and his Will was proved on 4th September 1838.  In the Will, he was referred to as ‘Reverend Robert Collett, Clerk of Westerham’.  In addition to the previously listed seven children, it is now known that Robert and Frances had another daughter who died at Torquay on 16th October 1848 at the age of 18, and she may have been Jesse, Jessie, Jesice or Jessica.

 

 

 

18O23

Frances Jane Collett

Born in 1811 at Little Ilford, Essex

 

18O24

Mary Anne Collett

Born in 1812 at Little Ilford, Essex

 

18O25

Robert Henry Collett

Born in 1814 at Little Ilford, Essex

 

18O26

Caroline Collett

Born in 1815 at Little Ilford, Essex

 

18O27

Helen Maria Collett

Born in 1817 at Little Ilford, Essex

 

18O28

William Lloyd Collett

Born in 1818 at Little Ilford, Essex

 

18O29

Henry Gerard Collett

Born in 1823 at Little Ilford, Essex

 

18O30

Christopher Theophilus Collett

Born in 1825 at Little Ilford, Essex

 

18O31

Jessie Collett

Born in 1827 at Little Ilford, Essex

 

18O32

Philip Morden Collett

Born in 1829 at Speedhurst, Kent

 

18O33

John James Collett

Born in 1832 at Westerham, Kent

 

 

 

 

18N14

William Brice Collett was born in London on 27th May 1785 where he was baptised on 29th June 1785 at St Pancras Church in Soper Lane, the second of two children of Robert Collett and Jane Brice.  Nothing else is known about William, except that he was still a bachelor when he died on 19th September 1808 at the age of 24.  He was subsequently buried at Bow Church in London, where his father, who had died sixteen years later, was a merchant.

 

 

 

 

18N15

Anna Collett was born at Swanton Morley in 1785 and it was there in All Saints Church that she was baptised on 29th April 1785, the eldest child of William Collett, Curate of Swanton Morley, and his wife Anna Carthew.  Anna was only twenty-one when she died at Swanton Morley on 16th November 1806 and was buried in the family grave at Al Saints Church, her father conducting the burial ceremony, as he had done the previous year for Anna’s sister Charlotte (below).

 

 

 

 

18N16

Charlotte Collett was born at Swanton Morley in 1787, where she was baptised on 28th January 1787, the second daughter of William and Anna Collett.  She was only 18 years old when she died on 27th February 1805 and was buried in the family grave at All Saints Church.  A memorial tribute to her father within the church also includes the names of Charlotte and her sister Anna (above) who died during the following year.

 

 

 

 

18N17

Sophia Collett was born at Swanton Morley in 1788, the third child of William Collett and Anna Carthew, and was baptised at All Saints Church on 17th February 1788.  She later married the much older John Deacon in November 1816.  John was a banker of London and of Mapledon Park in Kent and their marriage produced at least eight children.  By the time of the June census in 1841 six of their nine known children were living with the couple in the Marylebone Rectory registration of London, while the three absent children were very likely attending a boarding school elsewhere, since they were back living with the family ten years later.

 

 

 

The 1841 Census listed the family as John Deacon who was 65, Sophia Deacon who was 50, their daughters Mary and Sarah, who both had a rounded age of 20, Helen Deacon who was 14, Harriet Deacon who was 10, Lucy Deacon who was nine and Catherine Deacon who was eight years old.  Ten years after that the family was once again recorded at Marylebone Rectory when it was comprised John Deacon who was 78, his wife Sophia who was 60, Mary who was 29, Sophia who was 27, Honora who was 26, John who was 25, Ellen who was 23, Harriet who was 20, Lucy who was 19 and Catherine who was 18.

 

 

 

Sometime after 1851 the family left London, when they retired to the south coast and Hasting.  It was also during that decade that John Deacon died, leaving his widow Sophia, age 73, residing within the St Mary-in-the-Castle district of Hastings in 1861 with just three of her unmarried daughters.  They were Mary Deacon who was 42, Sophia Deacon who was 39 and Ellen B Deacon who was 34.  Sophia Deacon nee Collett died three years later at Hastings during 1864.

 

 

 

It is now established that Sophia’s daughter Sarah Deacon married the Reverend George Whitmore of Shropshire.  He was the younger son of the senior branch of the Whitmore family of Apley Park in Shropshire.  The Apley Whitmore family was related to the Wolryche Whitmore family at Dudmaston Hall in Shropshire, as well as the Whitmore family of Lower Slaughter in Gloucestershire which included two General George Whitmores, one of whom allegedly married Sarah Collett, the sister of Sophie Collett, which has now been disproved by Margaret Davison, a current day descendant of the Whitmore family.

 

 

 

 

18N18

Mary Collett was born at Swanton Morley in 1789 and was baptised there on 27th February 1789, the fourth daughter of William and Anna Collett.  It was also at Swanton Morley on 29th July 1811 that Mary married Thomas Leventhorpe of St Pancras London and Exmouth.  Their marriage only survived for eight years, when Mary died on 23rd September 1819.

 

 

 

 

18N19

Frances Elizabeth Collett was born at Swanton Morley in 1792 where she was baptised on 15th April 1792 the fifth child of William and Anna Collett.  She later married the Reverend John Preston Reynolds of Thetford, the son of Francis Riddell Reynolds of Great Yarmouth on 8th October 1818.  John was the brother of Phyllis Preston Reynolds, who married Frances’ brother William Collett (below), and he was educated at Caius College in Cambridge and later took on Necton Parish in Norfolk, where he served from 1845 to 1861 when he died.  His wife Frances Elizabeth Reynolds nee Collett passed away four years later during 1865.

 

 

 

The marriage produced at least two sons, both of them born at Little Munden in Hertfordshire most likely while John Preston Reynolds was the priest at All Saints Church in that village.  The first child John Collett Reynolds was born a year after Frances and John were married, during October 1819, while the second son William Collett Reynolds was born at there in 1826.  Both boys attended the King Edward Grammar School in Bury St Edmunds between 1831 and 1839.  It may also be of interest that in 1814 John Collett Reynolds of Little Witchingham, north of Norwich, and James Collett Reynolds of Rumburgh near Bungay in Suffolk were farmers of 74 acres and 112 acres respectively.

 

 

 

It was from the family of the Reverend John Preston Reynolds and his wife Frances Elizabeth Collett that today we have the family of their great granddaughter Gillian Shackleton Hawley, who has been instrumental in putting together details for this section of The Suffolk Line.  In 2012 Gillian was living on the Writtlemarsh estate at Blackheath in London, the area formerly being the site of the home of Sir John Morden, which is situated next to Morden College where William Collett (below) was the chaplain.  And it was from Gillian’s ‘Yorkshire Shackleton Family’ that the explorer Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton (1874-1922) was descended.

 

 

 

 

18N20

William Collett was born at Swanton Morley near Dereham in Norfolk and was baptised at All Saints Church in Swanton Morley on 17th August 1796, the youngest child and only son of William Collett and Anna Carthew.  His early education was conducted at North Walsham School, Hingham School, and Fransham School where he matriculated in 1815.  He entered Trinity College in Cambridge on 18th November 1814 but after just over a year he migrated to Sidney (Sussex College) on 23rd February 1816.  He gained a BA in 1819, and achieved an MA in 1825, by which time he was a married man with two children.  The university records confirm that he was the son of William Collett, Rector of Swanton Morley in Norfolk.

 

 

 

He married (1) Phyllis Preston Reynolds, the daughter of Francis Riddell Reynolds of Great Yarmouth, and the sister of the Reverend John Preston Reynolds who married William’s sister Frances Elizabeth Collett (above).  The wedding took place at St Nicholas’ Church in Great Yarmouth on 24th October 1820 after which the couple settled in Bramerton, five miles to the east of Norwich, where their first five children were born.  By the time of the birth of their sixth and last child William and Phyllis were living in Thetford.  Tragically it was over a year after the birth of their sixth child that Phyllis Preston Collett nee Reynolds died on 4th June 1831, at the age of 29.

 

 

 

Upon receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1819 he was ordained as a deacon in Norwich on 12th December that year, and less than a year later, he was made a priest on 15th October 1820.  From 1821 to 1836 he was Vicar (and patron) of Surlingham St Saviour with St Mary in Norwich, which overlapped with him being curate of St Mary’s Church in Thetford from 1828 to 1862.  He was also the curate at Thetford Hospital for a while.

 

 

 

Four years after the death of his wife, William married (2) Ellen Clarke Bidwell on 2nd June 1835.  Ellen was the daughter of Leonard Shelford Bidwell and Sarah Clarke.  William’s second marriage to Ellen, who was thirteen years younger than her husband, added another seven children to his family and all of them were born at Thetford.  It was during that time in his life that William was the Rector of Bressingham, to the east of Thetford, from 1836 to 1841.

 

 

 

Following his time as the Rector of Thetford from 1841 to 1861 he spent the period from 1862 to 1865 as the Chaplain of Morden College at Blackheath in South-East London, which was founded by Sir John Morden in 1700.  The method by which he achieved that position was by submitting a family tree which confirmed his connection to Elizabeth Morden, the first of four wives of the Reverend Thomas Carthew of Woodbridge Abbey, who was William’s maternal grandmother, being the mother of William’s mother Anna Carthew.

 

 

 

It was Elizabeth Morden's uncle, Sir William Morden, who inherited the Harbord family estate, at which time he was obliged to change his name to Harbord, following which the Harbords became Lord Suffield of Gunton Hall at Aylsham in Norfolk.  It was therefore fitting that one of his brother’s great grandchildren (William Collett) became the Chaplain at Morden College.  Upon his retirement as the outgoing chaplain, the position was filled by his distant cousin the Rev. Hon. John Harbord who held it from 1865 to 1892.  Such was the high regard for the Morden name, that William’s son Charles Preston Collett gave his daughter Margaret the second name of Morden, as did William’s cousin, Robert Henry Collett (above), who named his son Philip Morden Collett.

 

 

 

All of this information has been kindly provided by Gillian Shackleton Hawley the great granddaughter of Rev. John Preston Reynolds and Frances Collett (above). 

 

 

 

The first national census to be held in the United Kingdom on 6th June 1841 used rounded ages for adults, while children’s ages generally reflected their actual age.  On that day in 1841 William Collett and his family were living at Thetford, where William’s rounded age was 40.  His wife Ellen was 30, and the children living with the couple at that time were Anna Collett, age 19, Sophia Collett who was 13, Lucy Collett who was 11, Henry Collett who was five, Edward Collett who was three years old, and new born baby Mary Collett who was still under one year old.  Just seventeen months earlier William and Ellen suffered the loss of their daughter Ellen who was only a few months old.

 

 

 

The next census in 1851 for Thetford provided a better indication of their actual ages.  In that, William was 54 and Ellen was 41.  The same children as in 1841, with the exception of their son Henry, were still living with the couple, but with the addition of two extra children.  The children were Anna, age 29, Sophia 22, Lucy 21, Edward 13, Mary 10, Ellen who was eight, and Laura who was six years old.  As ten years earlier William and Ellen had again suffered the infant death of one of their children, in this case it was their youngest and last child Alfred.

 

 

 

By 1861 only five of William’s six daughters were still living with him and Ellen at the Rectory in Thetford.  The census revealed that William was 64, Ellen was 51, Anna was 39, Lucy was 31, Mary was 20, Ellen was 18, and Laura was 16.  Just four and a half years later, while William and Ellen were enjoying a holidaying at Whitby on the North Yorkshire coast, William died on 11th September 1866 at the age of 70, the same age that his father had died exactly forty years earlier.

 

 

 

In the north-east corner of the churchyard of All Saints Church at Swanton Morley near Dereham in Norfolk is the Collett family tomb wherein lie William’s father and mother, and his two eldest sisters Anna and Charlotte.  Whilst weathered after all these years the inscription on the gravestone includes the following reference to William Collett, the only son of William Collett, Rector of Swanton Morley and his wife Anna Carthew.

 

 

 

Also of their son The Revd. WILLIAM COLLETT, formerly of Thetford Norfolk,

And afterwards Chaplain of Morden College Blackheath

who died Sept. 11th 1866 in the 70th year of his age

And was laid to rest in Charlton Cemetery, Kent”

 

 

 

In a letter dated 21st February 1873 sent from the Great Stukeley Vicarage by Eliza Ebden, the daughter of Elizabeth Collett (Ref. 18M13) and her husband Doctor John Ebden, to her sons Frank and Edward Ebden, she referred to an earlier exchange of correspondence in which a Mr Collett was mentioned.  She wrote “the Mr Collett you enquired about, who seems to be in the Civil Service, your father thinks is a son of the later William Collett of Thetford who died and was found at Whitby, the place they (he and his wife) were sojourning at for the sea air.”  That was indeed a reference to this William Collett and his second wife Ellen Bidwell, while the unnamed son mentioned in the letter, was very likely a reference to Edward Collett, who was in the Civil Service. 

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1871, William’s his widow, Ellen C Collett age 61 and from Thetford, was living in the London area of Kingston-upon-Thames with her three youngest children, Mary Collett who was 30, Ellen A Collett who was 28, and Laura Collett who was 26.  Ellen’s eldest son Henry was in India by then, and her other son Edward Collett was living at Winchester in Hampshire.  Obviously upon the death of her husband Ellen and her family had to relinquish their occupation of The Rectory at Thetford. 

 

 

 

As regards the earlier children of William Collett, from his first marriage, his married son William Reynolds Collett was living at Humbleyard near Norwich in 1871, where two of his sisters Sophia Norgate and Lucy Collett were also living, while his brother, bachelor Charles Preston Collett, was living in the Westminster district of London.  According to the next census in 1881 Ellen C Collett of Thetford, a widow at 71, was living at Trafford House in Ewell Road at Kingston-upon-Thames with just two of her five children.  They were bachelor son Edward Collett who was 43, and unmarried daughter Ellen Collett who was 38, both of them from Thetford.

 

 

 

The family was still living at Kingston-upon-Thames ten years later when Ellen was 81.  Still living with her was her son Edward 53, and daughters Mary 50 and Ellen 48.  Upon the death of their mother during the 1890s, her three unmarried children left Kingston and moved into London, where they settled in the Kensington area of the city.

 

 

 

18O34

Anna Collett

Born in 1822 at Bramerton

 

18O35

William Reynolds Collett

Born in 1823 at Bramerton

 

18O36

John Collett

Born in 1824 at Bramerton

 

18O37

Charles Preston Collett

Born in 1826 at Bramerton

 

18O38

Sophia Collett

Born in 1828 at Bramerton

 

18O39

Lucy Frances Collett

Born in 1830 at Thetford

 

The children from William’s second marriage to Ellen Clark Bidwell were:

 

18O40

Henry Collett

Born in 1836 at Thetford

 

18O41

Edward Collett

Born in 1837 at Thetford

 

18O42

Ellen Collett

Born in 1839 at Thetford

 

18O43

Mary Collett

Born in 1840 at Thetford

 

18O44

Ellen Anna Collett

Born in 1842 at Thetford

 

18O45

Laura Collett

Born in 1844 at Thetford

 

18O46

Alfred Collett

Born in 1848 at Thetford

 

 

 

 

18N22

Woodthorpe Collett was born at Grundisburgh in Suffolk in 1795 and was the son of Woodthorpe Collett and his first wife Charlotte Spurling, who were married at Burgh near Woodbridge in July 1794.  Sadly his mother died during the following year, giving birth to his sister Charlotte (below).  Woodthorpe attended Woodbridge free school where he was a boarder on 4th February 1807 when he was described as Woodthorpe Collett of Clopton, a village one mile north of Grundisburgh.  He was educated at St Catherine’s College in Cambridge, which he entered on 27th March 1817, after he matriculated at Easter that same year.  His admissions record confirmed that he was the son of Woodthorpe Collett, and the grandson of Anthony Collett, Lord of the Manor of Eyke in Suffolk. 

 

 

 

He was awarded a BA in 1821 and on 17th June 1821 he was ordain Deacon of Buckden Parish Church, just south of Huntingdon.  The following year he accepted the position of stipendiary curate offered by George Pelham, the Bishop of Lincoln, which resulted in a move to Hainton, fifteen miles north-east of Lincoln, where he took up the post on 20th April 1824.  It was while he was living at Hainton in 1825 that Woodthorpe Collett married Elizabeth Pyemont, the daughter of the Reverend John Pyemont.  And it was there also that the couple’s first child was born.

 

 

 

He was awarded his Master of Arts degree in 1827 and that same year, on 18th October, he was working for John Kaye, the new Bishop of Lincoln, and had the use of a house at Wickenby, where he continued his work as stipendiary curate.  Wickenby lies between Lincoln and Hainton.  However, it would appear that the family only stayed at Wickenby for a short while since, by the time of the birth of the couple’s second child, Woodthorpe and Elizabeth were living in Suffolk.  And it was there, over the following years at Little Glemham, Sweffling, and Woodbridge, that all of their remaining children were born, all of which are situated within the area of the Plomesgate Hundred.

 

 

 

The move to Suffolk was prompted by the offer of the position of Curate at Blaxhall, the next village to the east of Little Glemham, while it was during 1836 that he became Headmaster of Woodbridge Grammar School, a post that he held until 27th December 1841.  By the time of the national census on 6th June 1841, Woodthorpe and his family were still living in Woodbridge, near Ipswich.  He and his wife were both recorded with a rounded age of 40, while their eight children were listed as John Collett 13, Henry Collett 12, Charles Collett 10, Elizabeth Collett who was nine, Catherine Collett who was eight, Robert Collett who was seven, Bertha Collett who was five, and William Collett who was two years old.  The couple’s missing eldest son Woodthorpe, who was 14, was attending boarding school in Ipswich St Clement at that time.

 

 

 

During 1842 Woodthorpe was appointed Principal of King’s College School at Nassau in the New Providence of Bahamas, and the following year he was made Rector of Normanton in Lincolnshire, a position he held from 1843 to 1854.  Sometime during the next few years he and his family moved into the village of Hasketon near Woodbridge where they were living at the time of the census in 1851.  By that time the family comprised Woodthorpe who was 55, as was his wife Elizabeth, and just four of their nine children.  They were Charles who was 20, Elizabeth who was 18, Catherine who was 16 and Robert who was 15.  Youngest son William, age 12, was attending boarding school in Ipswich St Clement, while older son Henry, age 21, was attending Trinity Hall College in Cambridge. 

 

 

 

Their absent daughter Bertha Emily Collett from Woodbridge was 13 and was receiving her education with the Sanderson family at their home in Ipswich St Matthew, while it is known that their son John was away working on the steam ships, and that he perhaps never returned to England.  Also living at the same address in 1851 were two members of Elizabeth’s Pyemont family, and they were Keeling Pyemont who was 66 and very likely Elizabeth’s older brother, and Letitia Pyemont who was 49.  In addition to them, the family employed a number of domestic servants.  Interestingly widow Letitia Pyemont aged 81 was the head of the household in 1881 when she had living with her at 27 Park Terrace on Fonnereau Road in Ipswich St Margaret her niece Bertha Emily Wright nee Collett, the married daughter of Elizabeth Collett nee Pyemont.

 

 

 

One year earlier, at the time of the entry to Trinity Hall College of his son Henry Pyemont Collett in July 1850, Woodthorpe Collett was described in the college records as being the Clerk of Hasketon near Woodbridge in Suffolk.  It was not long after 1851 that Woodthorpe secured a new position at Brightwell to the east of Ipswich, which resulted in another move for him and his family.  From 1854 to 1868 Woodthorpe was the Reverend Woodthorpe Collett of Brightwell and of Kesgrave, the former being confirmed at the marriage of his eldest daughter Elizabeth Charlotte Collett on 5th June 1860.  In addition to that, Woodthorpe’s son, the Reverend H P Collett, assisted the Reverend James Collett Ebden (see Ref. 18M13) during the wedding ceremony of his sister at Brightwell Church.

 

 

 

According to the census in 1861 for the parish of Foxhall within the Woodbridge & Colneis registration district, Woodthorpe Collett from Clopton was 65, his wife Elizabeth was 66 and, still living with the couple, were just three of their unmarried children.  They were Henry Pyemont Collett who was 32, Bertha Emily Collett who was 24, who had returned to the family after her absence in 1851, and William Michael Collett who was 23.

 

 

 

It was just over eight years later that Woodthorpe Collett died when he was living at Foxhall, just east of Brightwell, where he was buried on 14th June 1869 aged 73.  An article in the East Suffolk Gazette on 19th June 1869 reported that the Reverend Woodthorpe Collett, the incumbent of Brightwell-cum-Kesgrave, had died in his seventy-fourth year, thus placing his year of birth as the aforementioned 1796.

 

 

 

So by the time of the census in 1871, Woodthorpe’s widow Elizabeth, age 75, was living within the sub-district of Woodbridge known as Colneis, which lies between the Rivers Orwell and Deben.  Living there with her were three of her unmarried children and they were Woodthorpe S Collett, who was 44, Catherine A Collett, who was 37, and William M Collett, who was 32.  It was three years after that when Elizabeth Collett nee Pyemont died at Ipswich St Clement during March 1874, following which she was buried at Brightwell on 20th March 1874, aged 78.

 

 

 

18O47

Woodthorpe Schofield Collett

Born in 1826 at Hainton, Lincs

 

18O48

John Collett

Born in 1828 at Little Glemham

 

18O49

Henry Pyemont Collett

Born in 1829 at Little Glemham

 

18O50

Charles Keeling Collett

Born in 1830 at Little Glemham

 

18O51

Elizabeth Charlotte Collett

Born in 1831 at Sweffling

 

18O52

Catherine A Collett

Born in 1833 at Sweffling

 

18O53

Robert Ebden Collett

Born in 1835 at Woodbridge

 

18O54

Bertha Emily Collett

Born in 1837 at Woodbridge

 

18O55

William Michael Collett

Born in 1839 at Woodbridge

 

 

 

 

18N23

Charlotte Collett was born at Grundisburgh in 1797, the second child and only daughter of Woodthorpe Collett and Charlotte Spurling, her mother tragically dying either during or shortly after she was born.  Charlotte Collett was living in the St Matthews district of Ipswich in 1861 when she was 65 and her place of birth was Clopton near Grundisburgh.  It was there also where she died six years later, towards the end of October 1867, although she was then buried at Grundisburgh on 1st November 1867.

 

 

 

 

18N24

Letitia Mary Collett was born after 1798, the year in which her father, Woodthorpe Collett, married his second wife Letitia Skinner.  Letitia was very likely born at Grundisburgh and was in her early thirties when she married Thomas Read at Wetheringsett in Suffolk on 13th January 1834, where Thomas had been born.

 

 

 

 

18N25

James Collett was born in 1805, the son of Samuel Collett and Sarah Day.  In 1830 James married Sophia Ebden of Barton Bendish, the seventh child of Mary Grimmer and her husband Mr (Doctor) Thomas Ebden; Thomas being the brother of the James’ uncle John Ebden who had married Elizabeth Collett (Ref. 18M13).  The marriage of James and Sophia produced two children before great tragedy struck the family in 1836 when, first Sophia died during the month of January, and was followed later in the year by James, both of them passing away while the family was living at Loddon in Norfolk.  What happened to their two young children, at that time, has not been determined.

 

 

 

18O56

Fanny Collett

Born circa 1832 at Loddon

 

18O57

Ebden Collett

Born circa 1834 at Loddon

 

 

 

 

18N26

William Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1793 and was baptised there on 20th October 1793, the eldest child of William Collett and his second wife Ann Flint.  His early adult life appears to be shrouded in mystery, but recent discoveries in 2011 have determined that he was married three times, rather than just twice, as previously stated here.  However, it is still not known who his first wife was, except that when he married (2) Sarah Balary (Baldry) on 8th November 1817 at Cookley to the west of Halesworth, when he was 24, he was already a widower. 

 

 

 

It is also unclear as to how long he was married to Sarah Baldry, and whether or not their marriage produced any children.  What is known is that twenty years later, when he was 44, he married (3) Mary Ann Dye on 19th December 1837 at Poringland, which lies just five miles south of Norwich.  The couple’s marriage certificate revealed that they were both residents of Poringland Magna, that Mary was a spinster whose occupation was that of a servant, and whose father was John Dye, a butcher, while William was recorded as being a widower, who was also a labourer, as had been his father William Collett before him, who was confirmed as his father in the marriage register.

 

 

 

It would also appear that shortly after they were married, Mary Ann presented William with a son, and during the following few weeks the couple left Poringland and headed south across the county boundary into Suffolk, where the remainder of their children were born.

 

 

 

Upon leaving Poringland, William and Mary Ann, together with their infant son William, settled in the village of Henstead, near Kessingland, and it was there that the child’s birth was registered during the first quarter of 1838.  That confirms Mary Ann was with-child at the time of her wedding, just four months earlier, so perhaps the move to Suffolk was forced upon the couple to overcome any embarrassment.

 

 

 

Over the next two years the couple’s second child was born while the family was still living at Henstead, although by the time of the June census in 1841 the family was living at New Court in Halesworth.  William Collett was 48, his wife Mary Collett was 25, and their two children were William Collett who was three, and Honor Collett who was one year old.  It would therefore appear that the family had moved to Halesworth shortly after daughter Honor had been born at Henstead.  And it was at Halesworth where all of the remaining children of William and Mary Ann were born, and where the couple spent the rest of their lives together.

 

 

 

Five more children were born over the following ten years, although the family suffered the tragic loss of their son Daniel at the age of just three months, followed by the loss of their first daughter Honor eight years later.  So by 1851 the family was still living at 189 New Court in Halesworth when it comprised agricultural labourer William, age 57, his wife Mary Ann, age 33, plus their five surviving children.  They were, William Collett, age 13, Maria Collett who was seven, Eliza Collett who was four, Fanny Collett who was two, and John who was not yet one year old.

 

 

 

Towards the end of the next decade William and his family must have fallen on hard times because, on the day of the census in 1861, he was recorded as living in the Blything Union Workhouse at Bulcamp-with-Blythburgh in Suffolk.  William was described as an agricultural labourer and a married man from Fressingfield who was 67 who had living there with him his two sons John, who was eleven, and Charles who was eight, both of whom had been born at Halesworth.  It is thanks to Liz Whittaker that the three of them have been identified, where they have not been located up until 2013, because they were simply listed as W C, J C and C C.

 

 

 

At that same time in 1861 his wife was still a resident of Halesworth, where she was employed as a charwoman.  On that occasion though she was not living at New Court, where the family had been living at the time the two previous censuses were conducted.  Instead Mary Ann Collett, age 42, was living at Barrack Yard on Mill Hill Street in Halesworth with her daughters Maria 18, Eliza 13 and Fanny 11, and her youngest son Frederick who was five.  It therefore seems very likely that the accommodation where Mary Ann was living and working was not of a sufficient size to allow her husband and her two missing sons to stay there.

 

 

 

Ten years later Mary Ann Collett was still living at Barrack Yard where she died during the last few days of 1870 with her husband at her bedside, following which she was buried at Halesworth on 4th January 1871.  Just three months later William Collett, age 77, was listed as a widower in the census that year.  According to the census return he was once again living at New Court, at number 112, in Halesworth, from where he was still working as a labourer.  Sharing the accommodation with William were his two youngest children, his sons Charles Collett, age 17, and Frederick Collett who was 15.  By that time William’s eldest daughter Maria had been married for five years, while daughters Eliza and Fanny were still spinsters living and working away from home in London and Woodbridge respectively.

 

 

 

Also living at the same address with the three men in 1871 was spinster and domestic cook Susan Dye who was 53 and the younger sister of the late Mary Ann Collett.  Amazingly for that time in history, William survived for a further six years, when he died during November 1877 while living at Barrack Yard in Halesworth.  It was therefore at Halesworth that labourer William Collett was buried on 14th November 1877 at the age of 85.

 

 

 

Prior to the August 2011 update of Part 18, it was believed that William had another son from a previous marriage by the name of William Henry Collett (Ref. 18O57x), but it now transpires that his parents were very likely James and Elizabeth Collett.  So, in order not to lose the information already revealed and confirmed concerning William H Collett, this has now been removed from the main body of the file and placed in an appendix at the end of the third section of Part 18 (Ref. 18o4).  By so doing it is hoped that his place may be re-established in this family line at sometime in the future.

 

 

 

The nine known children from William’s third marriage to Mary Ann Dye were as follows:

 

18O58

William Collett

Born in 1838 at Poringland

 

18O59

Honor Collett

Born in 1840 at Henstead

 

18O60

Daniel Collett

Born in 1842 at Halesworth

 

18O61

Maria Collett

Born in 1843 at Halesworth

 

18O62

Eliza Susannah Collett

Born in 1847 at Halesworth

 

18O63

Fanny Collett

Born in 1849 at Halesworth

 

18O64

John Collett

Born in 1851 at Halesworth

 

18O65

Charles Collett

Born in 1853 at Halesworth

 

18O66

Frederick William Collett

Born in 1855 at Halesworth

 

 

 

 

18N27

Henry Collett was born at Fressingfield in early 1795 and it was there that he was baptised on 26th April 1795, the eldest child of William Collett and Ann Flint.  On 5th March 1821 Henry married Elizabeth Colls at Rushall in Norfolk, to the west of Harleston, where Elizabeth was born in 1796 and was baptised on 19th January 1797, the daughter of Christopher Colls and Mary Goldspink.  On the couple’s marriage certificate, Elizabeth was described as being of Great Glemham, near Framlingham, where the couple initially settled, but where something must have happened to cause them to be evicted just over two months after they were married.

 

 

 

An entry in the great Glemham Parish Records dated 16th May 1821 referred to a Removal Order on Henry Collett labourer and Elizabeth his wife, back to Mettingham.  By the time of the census in 1841, Henry Collett, age 45, and his wife Elizabeth, age 44, were still living in Mettingham with just four of their nine children.  All of their children were born at Mettingham, where three of them also died while still very young.  They where the couple’s two eldest daughters and their third son.  In addition to these losses, their two ‘missing’ eldest sons had already left the family home prior to the census day in June 1841.

 

 

 

The remaining four children were Mary Ann Collett who was 12, Susan Collett who was 10, Robert Collett who was nine, and five years old Christopher Collett.  Ten years later in 1851, the only child still living with the couple was Robert Collett, age 19, while labourer Henry was then 55, and Elizabeth 54.  Just over three and a half years after the census day in 1851 Henry Collett died at Mettingham, where he was buried at All Saints Church on 24th December 1854, aged 59.  His widow Elizabeth only survived him by fourteen months, when she was also buried at Mettingham on 24th February 1856.

 

 

 

18O67

William Collett

Born in 1822 at Mettingham

 

18O68

Henry Collett

Born in 1824 at Mettingham

 

18O69

Maria Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1825 at Mettingham

 

18O70

Samuel John Collett

Born in 1826 at Mettingham

 

18O71

Rachel Collett

Born in 1827 at Mettingham

 

18O72

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1828 at Mettingham

 

18O73

Susan Collett

Born in 1830 at Mettingham

 

18O74

Robert Collett

Born in 1831 at Mettingham

 

18O75

Christopher Collett

Born in 1836 at Mettingham

 

 

 

 

18N28

Charles Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1798 and was baptised there on 6th January 1799, the son of William and Ann Collett.  No other information has been discovered regarding Charles, who was not listed in any of the national census records.  It is therefore possible that he died prior to 1841. 

 

 

 

 

18N29

Samuel Collett was born in late 1800 or early 1801 at Fressingfield, where he was baptised on 12th April 1801, the son of William and Ann Collett.  He later married Marianne Read at Earsham near Bungay on 31st October 1826.  Marianne (Mary Ann) was older than Samuel by ten years and that may have been the reason why the only child attributed to the couple was their son Charles who was born at Earsham during the year after they were married.  Their son’s baptism record confirmed the parents as Samuel and Marianne Collett.  At the time of the 1841 Census, the family of three was still living at Earsham, near Bungay, within the Depwade & Harleston registration district.  Samuel Collett was 40, his wife Mary was 50, and son Charles Collett was 13 and confirmed as having been born at Earsham.

 

 

 

Following the departure of their son some years later, Samuel and Mary Ann were living alone in Earsham in 1851, where Samuel was 50 and a labourer, while his wife Mary was 60.  Ten years later, according to the census in 1861, Samuel Collett, age 60, was a patient being cared for at Norwich General Hospital, while at that same time his wife Mary Ann, at 72, was still at their home in Earsham, within the Depwade & Harleston registration district.

 

 

 

Samuel obviously recovered from his injury or illness, and it was his wife who passed away during the following years.  In 1871, as widower Samuel Collett aged 70, he was once again recorded as residing at Earsham, although no record of him has been found after the census that year.

 

 

 

18O76

Charles Collett

Born in 1827 at Earsham, nr Bungay

 

 

 

 

18N30

Benjamin Collett was born at Fressingfield in 1802 and was baptised there on 8th May 1803, the son of William and Ann Collett.  He lived all his life at Fressingfield, where he worked as a labourer, and it was there that he was twice married, and there also that all his children were born.  He married (1) Bertha Philpot, who was born in 1803, when they were both 21, and the wedding took place on 26th February 1824 in the parish church of St Peter & St Paul in Fressingfield.  It was later that same year that the first of the couple’s seven known children was born.  That may have taken place at Fressingfield, although the baptism of Benjamin Anthony Collett, the son of Benjamin and Bessiah (?) Collett, took place at nearby Cratfield, just seven months after they were married.

 

 

 

Upon presenting Benjamin with their seventh child it would appear that Bertha died, either during the birth, or shortly thereafter.  The parish records confirmed that Bertha Collett nee Philpot was buried on 24th April 1834 at the age of 30.  Five years later Benjamin Collett married (2) Sarah Vincent at Fressingfield on 21st May 1839, with whom he had a further three children.  Sarah was the daughter of labourer David Vincent.  It would also appear that Benjamin’s sons John and Charles had also died during that time, since both of them were missing from the 1841 Census and Benjamin had, by then, named a subsequent son Charles from his second marriage to Sarah.

 

 

 

According to the Fressingfield census of 1841 (within the Hoxne & Stradbroke registration district) Benjamin’s rounded age was 35 and Sarah’s was 30.  The children living with the couple were Benjamin (as Benjn) 17, William (as Willm) 15, Keziah (as Kesia) who was eight, Elizabeth (as Elizbth) who was seven, and Isaac who was six, from the first marriage, and brothers Charles who was two years old and baby George Collett who was just three months old, both from the second marriage.  A few years later Sarah presented Benjamin with their last child, daughter Sarah.  Also living with the family in 1841 was Benjamin’s father William Collett, age 85.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1851, agricultural labourer Benjamin was 48, his wife Sarah was 43, and the three of their four children still living with them were Charles Collett who was 11, George Collett who was 10, and daughter Sarah A Collett who was seven years old.  At that time the family was living in New Street in Fressingfield and had living there with them Mary Munn who was 79.  Also living nearby in New Street was Benjamin’s eldest son from his first marriage; Benjamin Collett junior, who was married with his own family by that time, and his youngest son from his first marriage Isaac Collett who was 15.

 

 

 

Benjamin’s eldest daughter Keziah, from his first marriage, was 18 at that time and was living and working in the South Ockendon & Orsett area of Essex, whilst the other two children from his first marriage, William and Elizabeth, have not yet been located in the census returns of 1851.  Over the next ten years the family members grew up and all of them had left their parent’s home in Fressingfield prior to 1861.  The census that year confirmed that Benjamin Collett was 61, and that Sarah was 56.  Their youngest son George was still living in the village, although by then he was married to Harriet. 

 

 

 

Benjamin survived for only another nine months, before he died at the start of 1862 and was buried at St Peter’s & St Paul’s Church at Fressingfield on 22nd January 1862 aged 59.  The cause of death was phthisis, a form of tuberculosis commonly referred to as the cobbler’s illness.  Tragically later that same year, Benjamin’s eldest son Benjamin died of the same wasting disease at the age of 38.  Following the death of her husband, his widow Sarah married widower James Wright who was a labourer and the son of thatcher Jonathan Wright.

 

 

 

18O77

Benjamin Anthony Collett

Born in 1824 at Fressingfield

 

18O78

William Collett

Born in 1826 at Fressingfield

 

18O79

John Collett

Born in 1828 at Fressingfield

 

18O80

Charles Collett

Born in 1829 at Fressingfield

 

18O81

Keziah Collett

Born in 1832 at Fressingfield

 

18O82

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1833 at Fressingfield

 

18O83

Isaac Collett

Born in 1834 at Fressingfield

 

The three children of Benjamin Collett and his second wife Sarah Vincent were:

 

18O84

Charles Collett

Born in 1839 at Fressingfield

 

18O85

George Collett

Born in 1841 at Fressingfield

 

18O86

Sarah Anne Collett

Born in 1843 at Fressingfield

 

 

 

 

18N31

John Collett was born at Fressingfield during 1805 and was baptised there on 29th September 1805, the youngest son of William Collett and Ann Flint.  John was around 20 years old when he married Catherine Baldwin at Ilketshall St Andrew in 1825.  Catherine was the daughter of John Baldwin and Catherine Freeman and was born at St James South Elmham, where she was baptised on 9th October 1803, St James South Elmham being around four miles north-east of Fressingfield.

 

 

 

It may be of interest to note that the parishes of Ilketshall St Andrew, Ilketshall St John, and Ilketshall St Lawrence cover an area south-east of Bungay and to the east of the Roman Road known as Stone Street (A144) from Halesworth to Bungay.  The three parish churches of St Andrew, St Lawrence, and St John the Baptist, lie within one kilometre of the centre of the village of Ilketshall St Andrew, while today the village of Ilketshall St John has become part of Ilketshall St Andrew, with Ilketshall St Lawrence just a couple of miles to the south.

 

 

 

The marriage of John Collett of Fressingfield and Catherine Baldwin of St James South Elmham is known to have produced five children for the couple and, although there are six children listed below, it is the first children Sarah who requires further validation.  It is likely that all six children were born at Ilketshall St Andrew, even though son Charles said he was born at nearby Ilketshall St Lawrence in a later census return.  Certainly at the time of the registration of birth of their son William at Ilketshall St Andrew in 1838, John Collett, an agricultural labourer, was named as the father, while the boy’s mother was recorded as Catherine Collett, formerly Baldwin.

 

 

 

The complete family, excluding Sarah, was living at Ilketshall St Andrew within the Wangford & Beccles registration district of Suffolk in June 1841.  According to the census that month, the family comprised John Collett, age 35, his wife Catherine 37, and their children John who was 12, Charles who was nine, Lucy who was four, William who was two years old, and latest arrival Robert, who was not yet twelve months old.  Possible daughter Sarah would have left school by then and therefore may have already started work and be living apart from the family.

 

 

 

Ten years later in 1851, the family was still living in the same village, when it was made up of John 45, Catherine 46, and four of their five previously listed children.  And they were Charles, who was 19, Lucy, who was 16, William, who was 11, and Robert who was 10 years old.  The couple’s absence eldest son John Collett had joined the army nearly five years earlier, and was very likely serving in India by that time. 

 

 

 

One by one, the other children eventually left the family home and, in the census of 1861, John Collett was recorded as living in a dwelling on the west side of the common in Ilketshall St Andrew with just two of his children for company.  John was 55 and from Fressingfield, his daughter Lucy Collett was 24, and his son William was 22, both of Ilketshall St Andrew.  All three members of the family were described as a hay trusser.

 

 

 

At that same time, John’s wife Catherine, age 56 and a labourer’s wife from St James (South Elmham), was recorded as a visitor at the Broad Street home in Bungay of Nathan Rumsby.  It is of interest that his housekeeper was unmarried Sarah Collett who was 34 and from Ilketshall St Andrew, and it seems highly likely that it was Sarah that Catherine was visiting as her mother.  By 1871 Catherine was once again living at Ilketshall St Andrew with her husband, where John Collett was 65 and his wife Catherine was 67, and by which time none of their children were still living were them.

 

 

 

Ten years later the census of 1881 recorded that the couple was living at Great Common in Ilketshall St Andrew, where John was employed on the land as a hay cutter, a change from his earlier occupation as a husbandman.  His place of birth was confirmed as Fressingfield and his age on that occasion was given as being 76, while his wife was 77 and her birthplace was confirmed as St James South Elmham.

 

 

 

Sometime during the following years, it would appear that John and Catherine were living in the Blything area of North Suffolk, since it was there that John died during the third quarter of 1887, following which he was buried at Ilketshall St Andrew on 4th September 1887 aged 84.  It was four years earlier that his wife Catherine had passed away, her death recorded at St Andrew in the second quarter of 1883, following which she was buried at Ilketshall St Andrew on 2nd May 1883, at the age of 79.

 

 

 

18O87

Sarah Collett

Born in 1826 at Ilketshall St Andrew

 

18O88

John Collett

Born in 1829 at Ilketshall St Andrew

 

18O89

Charles Collett

Born in 1831 at Ilketshall St Andrew

 

18O90

Lucy Collett

Born in 1835 at Ilketshall St Andrew

 

18O91

William Collett

Born in 1838 at Ilketshall St Andrew

 

18O92

Robert Collett

Born in 1840 at Ilketshall St Andrew

 

 

 

 

18N32

Lucy Collett was born at Fressingfield around 1807, the daughter child of William and Ann Collett.  It was also at Fressingfield where she married John Woolnough on 12th May 1828 with whom she had two known children.  The first of them was Eliza Woolnough who was baptised at Fressingfield on 12th September 1830.  By the time of the baptism of the couple’s second child the family was living at Tannington where John Woolnough was baptised on 13th May 1832.  Their son was born in the second half of February in 1832 and was just thirteen weeks old when he died at Tannington, although it was as John Woolner that his burial was recorded there on 22nd May 1832.

 

 

 

Around the time that her son was born at Tannington there was also recorded there the death of Lucy Woolnough at the age of only 24, following which she was buried at the Church of St Ethelbert on 19th February 1832.  It is therefore assumed that Lucy Woolnough nee Collett died during childbirth.  Less than two years later John Woolnough, a widower, married widow Ann Pendall at Tannington on 25th September 1834.  According to the census in 1841 John was living at Fressingfield with his new wife Ann and his daughter Elizabeth (previously Eliza), together with Ann’s daughter from her previous marriage, and two further children born to John and Ann.  During the next decade John Woolnough was made a widower for the second time in his life.

 

 

 

 

18N33

Phyllis Collett was very likely born around 1810 and she may have been the last child of William Collett and Ann Flint who was born at Fressingfield.  What is known for sure is that as Phillis Collett she married John Sayer at Stradbroke on 12th October 1833 and by June 1841 she had presented John with four children at Barlow Green in Stradbroke.  The census on that occasion listed the family as John and Phillace Sayer, both with an incorrect rounded age of 25, Ann Sayer who was six, William Sayer who was five, Mariah Sayer who was three, and Betsy Sayer who was one year old.  Living with the family was William Collett, age 85 and an agricultural labourer who was most likely Phyllis’ widowed father.  Tragically on 11th November 1841 Phillis Sayer nee Collett of Stradbroke died there of consumption and was buried at All Saints Church in the village on 18th November when her age was correctly recorded as 31.

 

 

 

 

18N34

John Collett was born at Wingfield in 1785, the son of John Collett of Stradbroke and Elizabeth Thurlow of Wingfield.  There was a John Collett age 55 who was born in Suffolk who was residing at Wilby in 1841.

 

 

 

 

18N35

Ann Collett was born at Saxmundham in 1791, the eldest daughter of John and Elizabeth Collett.  She was only twelve years old when her father was killed after falling out of tree.  As the eldest daughter she remained living with her widowed mother until she married John Hines at Saxmundham on 27th May 1817.

 

 

 

 

18N36

Hannah Collett was born at Saxmundham during 1793, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Collett.  Hannah later married Frederick King at Saxmundham on 16th June 1812.  Over the following decade Hannah presented Frederick with three daughters.  Emma King was baptised at Saxmundham on 29th January 1815, Rachel King was baptised at Blyford near Halesworth on 22nd November 1818, and Ann King was baptised at Bulcamp, also near Halesworth, on 29th April 1821.

 

 

 

 

18N37

Charles Collett was born at Saxmundham in 1795, the son of John and Elizabeth Collett.  It was in 1803 when Charles was eight years old that his father died after he fell from a tree.

 

 

 

The continuation of the family line of Charles Collett is provided in

Part 30 – The Suffolk & Norfolk Line starting at Ref. 30N4

 

 

 

 

18N38

William Collett was born at Saxmundham on 14th March 1798 where he was baptised at the parish church on 6th April 1798, the youngest known son of John Collett and Elizabeth Thurlow.  He was six weeks short of his fifth birthday when his father fell from a tree and died as a result of his injuries.

 

 

 

The continuation of the family line of William Collett is provided in

Part 30 – The Suffolk & Norfolk Line starting at Ref. 30N5

 

 

 

 

18N39

William Collett was baptised at Wilby on 10th September 1792, the base-born child of Hannah Collett, and may have been around two years old when he was baptised.  Tragically his mother died when he was about ten years old.

 

 

 

The continuation of the family line of William Collett is provided in

Part 20 – The Suffolk to Australia Line

 

 

 

 

18N40

Jemima (or Jeremiah) Collett was most likely a twin with sister Dinah (below).  They were both born at Wilby, where they were baptised in a joint ceremony on 25th May 1800, the children of William Collett and Dinah Lockwood.  Tragically, neither of them survived and both were buried together at Wilby on 8th June 1800, just two weeks after their baptism.

 

 

 

 

18N41

Dinah Collett was born at Wilby in 1800 and, with her likely twin Jemima (above), the pair of them were baptised at Wilby on 25th May 1800, where they were also buried two weeks later on 8th June 1800.

 

 

 

 

18N42

Mary Ann Collett was born at Wilby in 1802, where she was baptised on 17th October 1802, the third child of William and Dinah Collett.  Unlike her two older siblings, who both died when only a few weeks old, Mary Ann survived to reach the age of five and a half years, before she died and was buried at Wilby on 6th May 1808.

 

 

 

 

18N43

Dinah Collett was born at Wilby in 1804.  She later married (1) William Allum on 18th October 1824 at Worlingworth, a village in Suffolk next to Tannington.  William was born at Horham just two miles from Wilby, and it was at Wilby that the couple settled and where all of their children were born.  Although no record of the family has been found in the census of 1841, by 1851 they were still living in Wilby.  Dinah Allum from Wilby was 45, agricultural labourer William Allum from Norham was 50, their children still living with them were John 20, Jemima 18, Elizabeth 12, Hannah, age 10, and Dinah who was four.  By that time the couple’s eldest son William had already left the family home, as had son Robert, age 16, and Mary who was 15. 

 

 

 

Just over eighteen months later William Allum died at Wilby on 1st October 1852, following which Dinah then married Jeremiah Allum at Stradbroke on 20th February 1860.  It seems very likely that Jeremiah was William’s brother or his cousin.  According to the next census in 1861 Dinah Allum and her husband Jeremiah were both 56, and living with them at Wilby within the Hoxne & Dennington registration district was Dinah’s youngest child Dinah Allum who was 15.

 

 

 

Ten years later the couple was living alone in Wilby when Dinah Allum was 67 and Jeremiah was 68, and they were still there in 1881, living at Cole Street in Wilby.  Dinah from Wilby was 77, while Jeremiah Allum from Brundish was 78, when he was still working as an agricultural labourer.  Dinah’s eldest son William Allum married Mary Ann Harding on 28th December 1853, while her second son John was married and had a daughter Elizabeth Allum who married James Harwood.  James and Elizabeth had a daughter Eva Harwood who was the mother of Colin Carver, and it was Colin’s daughter Alison Carver who helped in expanding the family of Dinah Collett and William Allum.

 

 

 

 

18N44

Jemima Collett was born at Wilby where she was baptised on 4th April 1807, the daughter of William and Dinah Collett.  She later married William Scales at Stradbroke on 15th May 1826.

 

 

 

 

18N45

William Collett was born at Wilby and baptised there on 14th May 1809, the eldest surviving son of William Collett and Dinah Lockwood.  He married Elizabeth around 1830 and the couple settled in Cambridge where most of their children were born.  Further work still needs to be undertaken to complete the details for this family.

 

 

 

 

18N46

John Collett was born at Wilby, and it was there also that he was baptised on 30th January 1814, the son of William and Dinah Collett.  He was 25 in the Wilby census of 1841 when he was still living there with his parents, and it was also at Wilby that he married Mary Ann during the late 1840s, and where their three children were born.  At the time of the next census in 1851 John was 37, while he wife Marian (Mary Ann) was only 22, and their first child was Dinah Collett who was one year old.

 

 

 

Two more children were added to the family at Wilby during the next ten years, so in the census of 1861 the family comprised John Collett, age 44, his wife Mary A Collett, age 34, and their three children, Dinah, who was ten, William, who was eight, and Mary who was six.  No record of the family has been found in 1871,

 

 

 

By 1881 John Collett was a widower living at Cole Street in Wilby, and at 66 he was still working as an agricultural labourer, mostly likely with his youngest son James, age 18 and from Wilby, who was also an agricultural labourer.  Living with them at that time was John’s eldest daughter Dinah Brunning nee Collett, who was 30 and from Wilby, together with her husband Henry Brunning who was 25 and from Horham, and who was another agricultural labourer.  Also living in Cole Street, Wilby was John’s eldest son William, with his wife.

 

 

 

18O93

Dinah Collett

Born in 1850 at Wilby

 

18O94

William Collett

Born in 1852 at Wilby

 

18O95

Mary Collett

Born in 1854 at Wilby

 

18O96

James Collett

Born in 1862 at Wilby

 

 

 

 

18N47

James Collett was born at Wilby on 30th August 1817 and baptised there on 18th January 1818, the youngest son and last child of William Collett and Dinah Lockwood.  He married Lucy Mutimer on 19th October 1840 at Horham, which is north of Tannington and south of Stradbroke.  Lucy was born at Wilby in 1817, the daughter of Charles Mutimer and Elizabeth Cooke.  Just after they were married the couple was living in Wilby, where in June 1841 James was working as an agricultural labourer, when Lucy was anticipating the imminent arrival of their first child, their honeymoon baby.  James’ and Lucy’s first three children were all born at Wilby in Suffolk, while the remainder were born at Needham, just across the county boundary in Norfolk, after the family have moved there around 1845.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1851, the family was living at ‘the Street’ in Needham and was listed as labourer James, age 33, his wife Lucy who was 34, Martha who was nine, Mary who was eight, Emma who was seven, William who was four, Dinah who was one year old, and Eliza who was only a few months old.  Three further children were added to the family during the next decade.

 

 

 

So in the next census for Needham in 1861, the family was still living in the same dwelling as ten years earlier, by which time James and Lucy were both 44, Mary was 18, Emma was 17, William was 14, Eliza was 10, James was eight, Rachel was five, and George was three years old.  The reason for the absence of their daughters Martha and Dinah, was that Martha was married by then, while Dinah, who would have been 11, may not have survived beyond childhood.

 

 

 

Ten years forward found a depleted Collett family still living at ‘the Street’ in Needham, near Harleston.  James was 53, while his wife Lucy was 54, and the only child still living there with them was their youngest child George who was 13.  Still living in the village was their youngest daughter Rachel who was 15.

 

 

 

During the 1870s James passed away leaving his widow Lucy living at 21 Opposite Row in Lakenham in Norwich in 1881, with just her son George for company.  Lucy, age 63, was confirmed as having been born at Wilby, while her occupation was that of an SMS nurse.  George was still a bachelor at 23, and his place of birth was confirmed as Needham.  By 1891 Lucy was 74 and at that time she was still living with her son George who, by then had been married and widowed, although not before he was presented with three children by his late wife.  It was during the next decade that Lucy died, since she was no longer living with George in 1901.

 

 

 

18O97

Martha Collett

Born on 13.07.1841 at Wilby

 

18O98

Mary Collett

Born in 1842 at Wilby

 

18O99

Emma Collett

Born on 19.03.1844 at Wilby

 

18O100

William Collett

Born on 03.08.1846 at Needham

 

18O101

Dinah Elizabeth Collett

Born on 20.07.1849 at Needham

 

18O102

Eliza Collett

Born on 09.02.1851 at Needham

 

18O103

James Collett

Born on 23.08.1852 at Needham

 

18O104

Rachel Collett

Born on 24.04.1855 at Needham

 

18O105

George Collett

Born on 10.02.1858 at Needham

 

 

 

 

18N48

Ann Collett was born at Wetheringsett and was baptised on 24th June 1804 at Tannington, the eldest child of John Collett and Susan Watling.  She married her cousin Hezekiah Lockwood at Wilby on 29th November 1829.  Hezekiah, who was born at Wilby in 1806 and who died on 7th January 1872, was the son of Evans Lockwood and Ann Collett (Ref. 18M37), his mother Ann being the sister of Ann’s father John.  In 1881 Ann Lockwood nee Collett was an annuitant widow of 80 years living at Somersham in Suffolk at the home of her daughter Lydia.  Lydia Lockwood, who was born in 1830 at Coddenham in Suffolk, married Robert Sage who was born in 1826 at Flowton.  He was a farmer of nine acres and living and working with him in 1881 was his brother William Sage aged 67 and also of Flowton.

 

 

 

 

18N49

ROBERT COLLETT was born at Wilby where he was baptised on 23rd March 1805, the eldest son of John and Susan Collett.  He married his cousin Dinah Lockwood at Brundish, to the east of Tannington.  Dinah was the daughter of Hammond Lockwood and Elizabeth Everett, and was baptised at Sprowston on 4th April 1813.  All of Robert’s and Dinah’s children were also born and baptised at Wilby.  After the wealth enjoyed by previous generations of the Collett family, Robert and his family by contrast lived on the poverty line, with Robert having to find work as a bricklayer.  It was in Wilby that the family was living in 1841, when Robert was 30, his wife Dinah was 25, and their three children at that time were Elizabeth Collett, who was three, Hammond Collett, who was two years old, and Susan Collett who was still under one year old.

 

 

 

In 1850 Robert was sentenced at Ipswich to two weeks imprisonment for leaving his family chargeable to the Parish of Wilby.  At that time his wife Dinah and the children were living at the Hoxne Union Workhouse.  A year later, according to the census in 1851, Robert Collett was 45 and was living at the workhouse within the Hoxne & Stradbroke registration district with three of his children.  They were his eldest son Hammond who was 12, second eldest daughter Susan who was 10, and his son John who was six years old.  His son Robert had died four years earlier, but his three other children were living with his wife within the Hoxne & Dennington registration district.  Dinah Collett was 37, and the three children with her were the couple’s eldest daughter Elizabeth who was 13, and their two youngest children, Ann who was two, and Alfred who was not yet one year old.

 

 

 

According to the census in 1861 Robert Collett was 54, his wife Dinah was 47, and still living with them in the family’s home within the Hoxne & Dennington area were three of their children, John Collett who was 17, Ann Collett who was 12, and Alfred Collett who was 10 years old.  Staying with the family on that occasion was Robert’s unmarried sister Frances Collett (below) who was 49.  Living nearby was the couple’s eldest son Hammond Collett, age 22, while their eldest daughter Elizabeth Collett, also 22 and from Wilby, was living and working in the Kentish Town area of London.

 

 

 

Robert Collett died on 28th September 1873 at Hoxne in Norfolk and was buried at Wilby on that same day, when he was 67.  In the 1881 Census Dinah Collett was a widow aged 69.  The census return confirmed that she was born at Sprowston, and that she was living at the home of her son Alfred Collett at Framlingham Road in Wilby.  And only two doors away from her was her other son John and his family.  Dinah Collett survived for another seven years, when she died on 27th June 1888.

 

 

 

18O106

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1837 at Wilby

 

18O107

HAMMOND COLLETT

Born in 1839 at Wilby

 

18O108

Susan Collett

Born in 1841 at Wilby

 

18O109

John Collett

Born in 1843 at Wilby

 

18O110

Robert Collett

Born in 1845 at Wilby

 

18O111

Ann Collett

Born in 1849 at Wilby

 

18O112

Alfred Collett

Born in 1851 at Wilby

 

 

 

 

18N50

Harriet Collett was born at Wilby and was baptised there on 14th February 1808, but survived for just short of one year, when she was buried at Wilby on 13th January 1809, the daughter of John Collett and Susan Watling.

 

 

 

 

18N51

Frances Collett was born at Wilby and was baptised there on 24th June 1810, the daughter of John and Susan Collett.  It is understood that she never married and in 1841, following the death of her mother, she was living at Wilby with her widowed father when she was recorded in error as Francis Collett, age 25.  The only other member of the family living with them was Frances’ younger sister Hannah (below).  Twenty years later Frances Collett, age 49, was living with her married brother Robert (above) and his family at Wilby, where she was described as the sister of the head of the household.  It was thirteen years later that spinster Frances Collett died at Wilby during March in 1874 and it was there also that she was buried on 26th March 1874 at the age of 65.

 

 

 

 

18N52

Charity Collett was a twin born at Wilby during the month of May 1813 and was baptised there in a joint ceremony with her twin-sister Susan (below) on 21st June 1813.  She was the daughter of John and Susan Collett, and sadly she died within four days of her baptism and was buried at Wilby on 25th June 1813.

 

 

 

 

18N53

Susan Collett was a twin born at Wilby during the month of May 1813 and it was there that she was baptised in a joint ceremony with her twin-sister Charity (above) on 21st June 1813.  She died two months later and was buried on 25th August 1813, at the age of three months, and just two months after the death of her twin-sister Charity.

 

 

 

 

18N54

Hannah Collett was born at Wilby and was baptised there on 16th July 1815, the last child of John Collett and Susan Watling.  Following the death of her mother in 1840 Hannah, age 20, was living at Wilby with her father and her sister Frances in June 1841.  Ten years later she was a servant at a house in Wilby when she was 36.  Curiously in 1851 Hannah Collett of Wilby was living at Wickham Market when her age was stated as being 42 instead of 36.  She is known to have died after 1819.