PART TWENTY-THREE

 

The Wiltshire to Australia Line – 1550 to 1995

 

Updated June 2014

 

This is the family line of Dorothy Shepherd (Ref. 23R4) of Mount Tarcoola in Western Australia

and Christopher Lloyd whose great great grandfather was Edmund Lloyd (Ref. 23N3)

 

An earlier update included details of the life of Rose Laura Collett (Ref. 23P23)

who suffered badly at the hands of her Swedish husband Johan Hedlund,

all as provided by her great granddaughter Jenny Stanser

 

 

 

23F1

WILLIAM COLLETT was yeoman of Badbury near Swindon.  He married Elizabeth and died in 1603.  His Will was proved in 1604.

 

 

 

23G1

HENRY COLLETT

Born in 1570

 

23G2

Samuel Collett

Born in 1573

 

 

 

 

23G1

HENRY COLLETT was born in 1570 the eldest son of William Collett and like his father was yeoman of Badbury.

 

 

 

23H1

Robert Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

23H2

WILLIAM COLLETT

Born in 1602

 

23H3

Agnes Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

23H4

Margaret Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

23G2

Samuel Collett was born in 1573 the youngest son of William Collett and was yet another yeoman of Badbury.  He died during December 1639.

 

 

 

 

23H1

Robert Collett was the eldest son of Henry Collett and was a yeoman of Badbury.  He died after his son was born.

 

 

 

23I1

Henry Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

 

 

 

23H2

WILLIAM COLLETT was born in 1605 and was yeoman of Badbury and the second son of Henry Collett.  He married Mary Komm at Badbury and died intestate in 1660.

 

 

 

23I2

WILLIAM COLLETT

Born in 1651

 

23I3

Henry Collett

Born in 1654; died in 1661

 

23I4

Richard Collett

Born in 1655

 

23I5

Robert Collett

Born in 1657; died in 1661

 

23I6

John Collett

Born in 1659

 

 

 

 

23I1

Henry Collett was the eldest son of Robert Collett and a yeoman of Badbury.

 

 

 

23J1

Robert Collett

Born circa 1661

 

 

 

 

23I2

WILLIAM COLLETT was born in 1651 and was a yeoman of Badbury.  He married Mary at St Ann’s Church in Westminster and was a tallow merchant.  The first two of their five known children were baptised at St Martin-in-the-Field in Westminster, while two were baptised at St Anne Soho in Westminster.  The chandlery that William Collett owned was suspiciously burned down for a second time in 1700 during property inheritance disputes amongst the male members of the family at that time. 

 

 

 

William died in 1714 and Mary, who was born in 1653, had died a year earlier in 1713.  The family was known to have a connection with the church of St Giles-in-the-Fields in London where their son Richard was baptised.  William Collett was referred to in Peter G Laurie’s memoirs “Our Collett Ancestors” which was published in 1898.  In this he was described as being ‘William Collett of the Great House born 1651 and died 1714’.  The Great House referred to was in Hog Street in St Giles-in-the-Fields. 

 

 

 

At a later time Hog Street was renamed Crown Street and today is Charing Cross Road.  At one end of Hog Street there was a pond and that area became Tottenham Court Road and Tyburn Road which today is Oxford Street.  Nothing of the house remains today.

 

 

 

23J2

Martha Collett

Born on 19.10.1683

 

23J3

Mary Collett

Born on 23.12.1685

 

23J4

William Collett

Born in 1687

 

23J5

RICHARD COLLETT

Born in 1690

 

23J6

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1693

 

 

 

 

23I4

Richard Collett was born in 1655 was a citizen and vintner of London.  He married (1) Arrabella with whom he had two daughters who were baptised at St Margaret in Westminster.  It seems likely Arrabella died during or just after the birth of the second child, who also died when under three years old.  Richard later married (2) Elizabeth Hern in 1687 who presented her husband with six children of which only two of them survived to reach adulthood according to the Quaker records.  Richard Collett died on 27th June 1721 of dropsy.  He left a Will which was proved on 7th September 1721 in which property at Badbury was passed on, although the ownership and entitlement were disputed.  In his Will he was referred to him as ‘Richard Collett, vintner of London’.

 

 

 

23J7

Susanna Collett

Born on 29.10.1682

 

23J8

Mary Collett

Born in 1684

 

23J9

Still born child

Born in 1688

 

23J10

Mordecai Collett

Born in 1689; died in 1689

 

23J11

William Collett

Born in 1691; died in 1714

 

23J12

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1693

 

23J13

Jeremiah Collett

Born in 1695; died in 1698

 

23J14

Thomas Collett

Born in 1696; died in 1697

 

 

 

 

23J1

Robert Collett was born around 1661 and at the age of seven years he was placed in the care of his uncle Richard Collett in December 1668.  He married Ada Freeman in 1706.

 

 

 

 

23J2

Martha Collett was born in Westminster on 19th October 1683 and was baptised at St Martin-in-the-field on 24th October 1683, as the daughter of William and Mary Collett.  She married (1) John Pinke and later married (2) Richard Pane in 1726 at Lincoln’s Inn Chapel in Holborn, London.

 

 

 

 

23J3

Mary Collett was born at Westminster on 23rd December 1685 and was baptised at St Martin-in-the-field on 1st January 1686, the baptism record confirming that she was the daughter of William and Mary Collett.

 

 

 

 

23J4

William Collett was born in Westminster in 1687 and was baptised at St Anne Soho in Westminster on 9th January 1687, the eldest son of William and Mary Collett.

 

 

 

 

23J5

RICHARD COLLETT was born in London around 1690 and was baptised that year at St Giles-in-the-Fields in London which confirmed he was the son of William and Mary Collett.  He was a tallow chandler and he married Elizabeth Cobb in 1717.  Richard died in July 1748 and was followed by Elizabeth in 1774.

 

 

 

23K1

RICHARD COBB COLLETT

Born in 1718

 

23K2

John Collett

Born in 1719

 

23K3

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1721

 

23K4

Sarah Collett

Born in 1725

 

23K5

Peter Collett

Born on 27.10.1734

 

 

 

 

23J6

Elizabeth Collett was born in London in 1693 and was baptised at St Anne Soho in Westminster on 10th May 1693 when her parents were recorded as being William and Mary Collett.

 

 

 

 

23J7

Susanna Collett was born in London on 29th October 1682 and was baptised at St Margaret in Westminster on 3rd November 1682, the record confirming she was the daughter of Richard and Arrabella Collett.  In 1703 she married James Norton a citizen and dyer of London.  The couple never had any children and Susanna died after her father had died in 1721 since she was referred to in his Will.

 

 

 

 

23J8

Mary Collett was born in London 1684 and was baptised at St Margaret in Westminster on 3rd April 1684.  The baptism the record listed her parents as Richard and Isabella Collett rather than Richard and Arrabella.  Mary was around three years old when she died in 1687.

 

 

 

 

23J12

Elizabeth Collett was born in 1693.  She married in 1721 (1) John Green a wine cooper from London and (2) Thomas Greenhill of Bath in 1735.  Thomas died in 1666 and his Will was proved in 1668.  Neither of the marriages produced any children and Elizabeth died in 1768.  In her Will she left property to her cousin Elizabeth Collett nee Cobb, the widow of Richard Collett the elder (above).

 

 

 

 

23K1

RICHARD COBB COLLETT was born in London in 1718, and was the eldest son of Richard Collett and Elizabeth Cobb.  He later married Mary Harrison around 1750.  Richard Cobb Collett died during February 1788 and his Will was proved on 29th March 1788.  In the Will he was referred to as ‘Richard Collett, Gentleman of St Luke’s Chelsea’.

 

 

 

23L1

RICHARD COBB COLLETT

Born on 28.02.1752

 

 

 

 

23K2

John Collett was born in London in 1719 and was the son of Richard Collett and Elizabeth Cobb.  The ship ‘Doddington’ in which he was travelling was wrecked on rocks near Bird Island off Port Elizabeth on the South Africa coast on 17th July 1755.  The ship and its cargo of gold owned by the merchant adventurer Robert Clive of the East India Company was lost and was subject to salvage recovery in 1977.  By that time in 1755 John was a married man, and tragically it was also on the Doddington that John’s wife was that fatefully day when she was swept overboard out of the arms of her husband and into the swirling sea.  John and twenty-two others managed to swim to Bird Rock where later his wife’s body was washed ashore and was buried.  John eventually survived the ordeal but later died of the fever.  The full story of Robinson Crusoe Collett as written by Peter George Laurie (Ref. 23O24) the great great grandson of John’s brother Richard Cobb Collett (above) was serialised over a number of months in the Monthly Collett Newsletter.

 

 

 

 

23K3

Elizabeth Collett was born in London in 1721 and was baptised at St James in Clerkenwell 2nd July 1721, the baptism record confirming she was the daughter of Richard Collett and Elizabeth Cobb.  Tragically she suffered an infant death.

 

 

 

 

23K4

Sarah Collett was born in London in 1725 the daughter of Richard Collett and Elizabeth Cobb.  It is also known that she married Joseph Lowe a jeweller of Holborn in London, and that she died on 15th August 1773.

 

 

 

 

23K5

Peter Collett was born in London on 27th October 1734 and was baptised at St Olave Old Jewry in the City of London on 25th November 1734.  He was the youngest son of Richard Collett and Elizabeth Cobb.  St Olave’s Church was dedicated to the patron saint of Norway, while Old Jewry was a precinct of medieval London populated by Jew until their expulsion from England in 1290.  The original church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 but was rebuilt in 1679 by the office of Sir Christopher Wren.

 

 

 

Peter Collett attended St John’s College at Oxford where he matriculated on 17th August 1751 at the age of 16.  The university records confirm that he was the son of Richard Collett of London.  Peter obtained his Bachelor of Arts at Oxford on 2nd March 1756 and four years later he took up the role of curate of the parish church at Rye in Sussex, a position he held for thirty years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shortly after securing that appointment Peter married (1) Margaret Bourne who was born in 1734 but who died at Rye in Sussex on 6th May 1770 at the age of 36.  Prior to her death Margaret presented Peter with five children, three of which died while still in their infancy although the name of the third child is not known at this time.  Following the death of his first wife Peter then married (2) Elizabeth Woodhams who was eleven years younger than Peter having been born in 1746.  That marriage produced another five children for Peter all of whom survived.

 

 

 

During his life, and in addition to being the Reverend Peter Collett, he was also the Rector of Denton.  Peter died at Rye on 14th September 1790 where he was also buried and was survived by his second wife Elizabeth for a further fifty years after his death.  Elizabeth lived to be 95 and died on 11th February 1841 and was also buried at Rye.  A white marble plaque on the wall inside Rye Parish Church reads as follows:

 

 

 

“Sacred to the memory of Mrs Margaret Collett wife of the Reverend Peter Collett who died the 6th of May 1770 aged 36 years.  Also of the above named Rev. Peter Collett Rector of Denton in this county and curate of this parish thirty years who died the 14th of September 1790 aged 55 years.  And of three children who died in their infancy.  Also of Elizabeth relict of the above named who died the 11th of February 1841 aged 95 years”

 

 

 

23L2

Margaret Collett

Born in 1763

 

23L3

Elizabeth Collett

Born in 1765

 

23L4

Peter Collett

Born in 1767; infant death

 

23L5

Jacky Collett

Born in 1769; infant death

 

23L6

Sarah Collett

Born in 1775

 

23L7

Richard Collett

Born in 1777

 

23L8

Anne Collett

Born in 1779

 

23L9

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1781

 

23L10

Thomas Collett

Born in 1784

 

 

 

 

23L1

RICHARD COBB COLLETT was born in London on 28th February 1752 and was baptised at St Martin Orgar & St Clement Eastcheap in London, the baptism record confirming his parents as Richard Cobb Collett and his wife Mary.  Richard married Ann Parker on 18th May 1773 at St Bartholomew the Great in London.  He eventually became an attorney and later established the law firm of Collett, Wimburn & Collett at Chancery Lane in London with Rowland Wimburn who were joined by Richard’s son Kenrick in 1797.  Ten years later in 1807 Richard was appointed to the office of “One of the Four Sworn Attorneys of the Court of Exchequer of Pleas” a title that was taken up by his son Kenrick between 1824 and 1826, prior to Richard’s death in 1827.  On 23rd May 1821 the address for Collett, Wimburn & Collett was stated as being 62 Chancery Lane.

 

 

 

The Will of Richard Cobb Collett was proved on 10th March 1827.  In the Will he was referred to as simply ‘Richard Collett, gentleman of Turnham Green in Middlesex’.  There was a reference to the christian name Cobb which, it was stated, was not generally used by Richard.  In addition to all of the above, Richard Cobb Collett was coroner for the County of Middlesex and was referred to at the time of the death of his son Kenrick Collett in 1841 as “formerly of Chancery Lane and Acton and late of Turnham Green.  It was ten years earlier on 1st February 1831 that Richard’s wife Ann Collett nee Parker died at Turnham Green.

 

 

 

The following are some of the notices relating to the work undertaken by the company of Collett, Wimburn & Collett:

 

 

 

Sale Notice in The Times on 25th February 1800 – of freehold land at Plaistow Marsh, Poplar and Whitechapel.  By Messrs Collett, Wimburn & Collett Solicitors of Chancery Lane.

 

Notice in The Times on Tuesday 15th December 1818 – all persons indebted to Messrs Hasting & White of Haymarket, chemists and druggists, previous to the 20th July 1816 (the day Mr Hastings died) are requested to pay the same forthwith to his surviving partner Mr White now carrying on the same business there, in partnership with his widow, under the firm of Hastings & White, in order to enable the Executors of Mr Hastings to settle the accounts of their partnership.  Collett, Wimburn & Collett of Chancery Lane in London, Solicitors to the Executors.

 

Notice in the London Gazette on 6th July 1819 and published in The Times the following day - Collett, Wimburn & Collett of Chancery Lane in London represented bankrupt R Miller grocer of Taunton at The Globe Tavern in Exeter on 22nd 23rd July and 17th August.

 

Notice in the London Gazette on 16th November 1819 and published in The Times the following day - Collett, Wimburn & Collett of Chancery Lane in London represented bankrupt T Harris inn keeper of Evesham at The Bell Inn, Evesham on 7th, 8th and 28th December.

 

Sale Notice in The Times on 19th June 1820 – desirable freehold mansion in Kenilworth.

 

Notice in the London Gazette on 2nd December 1820 and published in The Times two days later - Collett, Wimburn & Collett of Chancery Lane in London represented bankrupt J Allen inn keeper of Warwick at The King’s Head Inn, Warwick on 7th, 8th December and 13th January.

 

 

 

23M1

KENRICK COLLETT

Born on 01.01.1775

 

23M2

Clayton Collett

Born on 05.11.1776

 

23M3

Richard Collett

Born on 05.11.1778

 

23M4

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1780; infant death

 

23M5

Robert Collett

Born in 1782

 

 

 

 

23L2

Margaret Collett was born in 1763, the daughter of Peter Collett and Margaret Bourne.  Around 1780 she married John Shoppee the son of J Shoppee and brother of Charles Shoppee who married Margaret’s sister Elizabeth (below).

 

 

 

 

23L3

Elizabeth Collett was born in 1765 and she married Charles Shoppee the son of J Shoppee and the brother of John Shoppee who married Elizabeth’s sister Margaret Collett (above).

 

 

 

It may be significant that in Australia there were many people with the Shoppee surname that had Collett as part of their name.  They include:  Clarence Collett Shoppee (born 2nd April 1902); John Stephen Collett Shoppee (born 27th March 1904); Walter Henry Collett Shoppee (born 26th January 1914); Charles Tilley Collett Shoppee (an aircrafts man in WWII); all of whom were involved in WWII.

 

 

 

In addition to these there was the celebrated Dame Marjorie Alice Collett Parker OBE, formerly Marjorie Alice Collett Shoppee, the daughter of W Shoppee, who was born at Ballarat and who died on 18th February 1991, who had married Max Parker on 12th June 1926.

 

 

 

 

23L6

Sarah Collett was born in 1775 and was the daughter of Peter Collett and Elizabeth Woodhams.  She never married, just like her two younger sisters Anne and Mary (below).

 

 

 

 

23L7

Richard Collett was born in 1777 and was the son of Peter Collett and Elizabeth Woodhams.  It is known that he was an assistant surgeon with the 2nd Bombay Native Infantry and died on 25th June 1802 at Cannamore, probably as a direct result of the fighting which came to an end that year.

 

 

 

 

23L8

Anne Collett was born in 1779 and was the daughter of Peter Collett and Elizabeth Woodhams.  She never married and lived at Primley Hill in Paignton in Devon.  She died on 19.11.1854 and was buried at Bromley in Kent.  In her Will, which was proved on 28th December 1854, she was referred to as ‘Anne Collett, spinster of Bromley in Kent’.

 

 

 

 

23L9

Mary Ann Collett was born in 1781, the daughter of Peter Collett and Elizabeth Woodhams.  She attended Bromley College and died at Bromley in Kent in May 1849.

 

 

 

 

23L10

Thomas Collett was born in 1784 and he married Sarah Ireland with whom he had two daughters.  He died in 1858

 

 

 

 

23M1

KENRICK COLLETT was born on 1st January 1775 and was baptised at St Andrews in Holborn on 27th January 1775.  He was named after Sir Kenrick Clayton, Baronet of Marden Park in Surrey to whose family his father Richard Cobb Collett had acted for many years as confidential adviser and trustee.  In 1797 he joined his father’s firm of Collett, Wimburn & Collett at Chancery Lane in London.  Five years later on the 7th December 1802 at St Andrews Church in Holborn he married Mary Anne Webb the daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Webb of Hanwell who was born on 12th March 1785.

 

 

 

Kenrick and his wife lived with the Lloyd family in Harley Street (see other references to the Lloyd family at 23N2, 23N3, 23O6 and 23O7) but frequently spent the winter months at Chancery Lane owing to the transportation difficulties during severe bouts of weather.  All of their children received their early education at Burlington House, a well known seminary in Fulham run by the Reverend Robert Roy.

 

 

 

In 1807 Kenrick, who was an attorney like his father, was promoted to the office of “One of the Four Official Clerks”.  From 1824 to 1826 he took over the office of “One of the Four Sworn Attorneys of the Court of Exchequer of Pleas” previously held by his father from 1807.  Upon the death of his father in 1827 Kenrick continued his work at Collett, Wimburn & Collett although the company named went through many changes over the following years.  On 16th October 1830 it was trading as Wimburn, Collett & Collett, with presumably Kenrick’s eldest son and namesake joining the company.  Then on 8th June the following year the name was changed again to Wimburn, Collett & Dyson after Kenrick William Collett left the firm to pursue a separate career.

 

 

 

Two years later in 1833 Kenrick became “Master of the Court of the Exchequer” a post he held up to his death, while two years later the company name was shortened to Wimburn & Collett.  He died on 25th February 1841 at 57 Harley Street and was buried in the family grave at Paddington on 4th March 1841.  It was also around that time that Kenrick’s two sons Henry and Charles took over the law firm, with Mr Charles Collett of Wimburn & Collett being named in The Times on 21st August 1841 in an article relating to the Summer Assizes at Croydon.

 

 

 

The Will of Kenrick Collett was made in 1833 and named his two sons Henry Parker and Charles Mynors as trustees, the whole of his estate being left to his wife who, within a year of his death, was remarried (see below).  Surprisingly perhaps, not one of his children was named in, or benefited from, his Will.  At the time of the married of his youngest daughter Elizabeth Collett in 1834, Kenrick was described as “of Harley Street and Holcrofts in Fulham”, the latter being the home of Samuel Webb, Kenrick’s father-in-law.

 

 

 

In 1838 Kenrick Collett owned the following properties and was therefore entitled to vote at each of these locations: 44 Mansell Street; 12-14 Chamber Street; the Red Lion Public House all in the parish of St. Mary Whitechapel; Red Lion Stable Yard and shop; two houses adjoining in Castle Street Leicester Square; one house in Hemming Row and four houses in Princes Court, Whitcomb Street in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields.  Other properties in his ownership were:

 

 

 

The Three Tuns* Public House and other houses occupied by Sibley and Jennings in the parish of St. Mary Abbotts Kensington; ten houses from 6 to 28 Rose & Crown Court, numbers 3, 4, 5, 15 and 16 Daggett’s Court, and 1-2 Daggett’s Court Passage at Moorfields in the parish of St. Leonards, Shoreditch.  He also owned property in Church Passage in the parish of St. Lawrence Jewry; 20-21 New Street in the parish of St. Bartholomew the Great; and 2 Ten Court in the parish of St. Gabriel, Fenchurch.

 

 

 

On 1st February 1842, less than twelve months after Kenrick’s death, his widow Mary Ann Collett nee Webb, aged 57, married the Reverend Martin John Lloyd of Depden in Suffolk at Holy Trinity Church in Sloane Street, Belgravia in London.  The marriage shocked the family as Martin was at least twenty years younger than Mary Ann and was in fact the brother-in-law of Mary Ann’s own daughter Mary Ann Collett (below) who married Edmund Lloyd.

 

 

 

The Rev. Martin John Lloyd was the son of Edmund Lloyd and Bridget Eyre and was born on 20th May 1805 and was baptised at St Marylebone Church in London by the Reverend David Evans.  In 1832 Martin was considering marrying Sarah Loretta Timperon but her father would not agree as Martin, at that time, had no means by which to support her in the manner to which she was accustomed.  However, his personal situation improved over the following years, first in 1834 when he achieved an MA at Cambridge and became a priest at Worcester.  Around that time he began writing to the Duke of Richmond using his then home address of Cavendish Square in Marylebone. 

 

 

 

Two years later in 1836 the Duke, who was present at Quebec Chapel in London for one of Martin’s services, was impressed enough to offer him the Rectory at Depden and 30 acres of glebe land, together with an annual salary of £5,000.  Depden lies midway between Haverhill and Bury St Edmunds.  His new found wealth resulted in consent being given by Joseph Timperon for Martin to marry his daughter, and to be told that he would provide her with a dowry of £10,000 on their wedding day and a further £10,000 on his death.

 

 

 

Martin and Sarah were subsequently married on 18th May 1836 at St Peter’s Church in St Albans, the event being reported in The Times on 20th May as follows:  the Rev. Martin John Lloyd of St. John’s College, Cambridge, Domestic Chaplain to his Grace the Duke of Richmond and Rector of Depden, Suffolk to Sarah Loretta, eldest daughter of Joseph Timperon of New Barnes House, Herts.

 

 

 

It will be of particular interest to Collett researchers that on 8th November 1806 at St Marylebone, Sarah Timperon’s father Joseph of Harley Street married Anne Kyte the daughter of the late Reverend Doctor Kyte.

 

 

 

Exactly two years after Martin and Sarah were married Sarah died on 3rd May 1838 at Horringer near Bury St Edmunds only a few days after giving birth to a still born son who would have been the couple’s first child.  A memorial plaque on the church wall at St Mary’s in Depden, where she was buried, commemorates her passing in her thirtieth year.

 

 

 

Martin could not bear to live in the same house after Sarah’s death, so he dismissed all of the staff and moved into another house owned by the Duke of Richmond at Goodwood.  It was therefore less than four years after Sarah’s death that he then married the widow Mary Ann Collett, the event reported as follows:

 

 

 

“On the 1st February 1842 at the Church of the Holy Trinity, Chelsea, Rev. Martin John Lloyd M.A. Domestic Chaplain to his Grace the Duke of Richmond & Rector of Depden, Suffolk to Mary Ann relict of the late Kenrick Collett of Holcrofts, Fulham.”  And so, in that way, Mary Ann became sister-in-law to her own daughter.

 

 

 

Martin then organised the building of a new rectory at Depden and during its construction he and Mary Ann rented Branches Park Mansion from Mrs. Phoebe Ann Usborne of Queen Anne Street in Marylebone at £150 per quarter for three years.  The edition of The Times published on 17th July 1848 reported the death of Mary Ann Lloyd as taking place on 14th July 1848, the same day that she was buried at Depden.  She died of cancer of the breast and her tombstone, which stands about seven feet high and under the shade of an elm tree, was inscribed as follows:

 

 

 

“In a vault beneath are deposited the remains of Mary Ann Lloyd beloved wife of Martin John Lloyd Rector of this Parish who under a deep sense of the blessing derived from a union of  several years has caused this monument to be erected”

 

 

 

The description on her Will read as follows: ‘Mary Ann Lloyd, formerly Collett and before that Webb, wife of Depden in Suffolk, her Will proved on 25th September 1848’.  Ten years later, on 28th January 1858 at St Mary’s Church in Cheltenham, Martin married for a third time.  She was Adelaide Elizabeth daughter of the late Lt. Colonel Gregory of Bath and grand-daughter of the Honourable John Forsyth of Montreal in Canada.

 

 

 

That marriage for Martin lasted for the longest period of any of his three marriages, before he passed away on 13th September 1872.  He died while at Depden of paralysis and was buried in a shallow grave alongside the monument to Mary Ann his second wife.  Today the churchyard where they were buried is designated as deconsecrated ground.

 

 

 

His Will had been made on 30th November 1858 and was proved on 3rd January 1873.  He left his estates at Depden and St. Botolphs in Bishopgate, London to his wife Adelaide.  His effects were valued at under £450 and his wife’s address was given as Belle View Cottage in Cheltenham.  During his life Martin officiated at a number of weddings for his siblings and other relatives and, in addition to his role as rector, he was also a Magistrate for Suffolk County.

 

 

 

It is interesting to note that The Three Tuns* Public House in Kensington High Street, previously owned by Mary Ann’s first husband Kenrick Collett, was in December 1844 transferred to the joint ownership of (1) Martin J. Lloyd, Rector of Depden and Mary Ann his wife, (2) Henry Crawler of Chancery Lane, (3) John Laurie of Holcrofts, Fulham, and (4) Peter Laurie of Lincoln’s Inn.  John Laurie married Elizabeth Helen Collett (below) and Peter was his brother.

 

 

 

23N1

Kenrick William Collett

Born on 06.10.1804

 

23N2

Henry Parker Collett

Born on 26.09.1805

 

23N3

Mary Ann Collett

Born on 16.05.1807

 

23N4

John Edward Collett

Born on 03.02.1809

 

23N5

George Frederick Collett

Born on 27.08.1810

 

23N6

Charles Mynors Collett

Born on 12.08.1812

 

23N7

ROWLAND WILLIAM DAVIES COLLETT

Born on 25.02.1814

 

23N8

Elizabeth Helen Collett

Born on 23.06.1815

 

23N9

Richard Fowler Collett

Born on 06.01.1819

 

 

 

 

23M2

Clayton Collett was born in London on 5th November 1776 and was baptised at St Andrews in Holborn on 2nd December 1776.  His parents were Richard Cobb Collett and his wife Ann, but sadly Clayton did not survive beyond infancy.

 

 

 

 

23M3

Richard Collett was born at the Breams Building in London on 5th November 1778 and was baptised at St Dunstan-in-the-West in London on 11th December 1778.  The baptism record confirmed his parents were Richard Cobb Collett and Ann Collett.  Later in his life he was known as Richard Collett, ironmonger of Middle Row in Holborn.  In 1805 he married Jane Newsome of Blackrock, Cork in Ireland and tragically all three of their children died before their parents.  Their deaths were the result of the smallpox epidemic, following which all of the children were buried at St Andrew’s Cemetery.  See also George Frederick Collett (above) another victim of smallpox.

 

 

 

In 1837 Richard was declared bankrupt and that year’s May-August edition of the Metropolitan Magazine contained a list of bankrupts including the following entry on page 26 “R Collett, Middle Row, Holborn, ironmonger”.  That event coincided with a change of address since, according to Dawn Peel an historian from Colac in Victoria Australia, Richard and Jane provided a home at 3 The Crescent in Edmonton for Anna Godwin from 1837 when she was orphaned at the age of 15. 

 

 

 

The Crescent stands on the east side of Hertford Road immediately north of Edmonton Green.  It was built in the mid eighteen-twenties, but was never finished as there is a gap at the northern end where further houses were to be built.  Early census records for 1841, 1851 and 1861 reveal that the inhabitants were both middle class and genteel.

 

 

 

Jane Collett nee Newsome, who was the sister of Anna Godwin’s mother from Cork, became the mother figure for Anna for the next twenty years and almost up until her death in 1857.  The couple’s Edmonton home was also the base for one of Anna's brothers and his family.  It is understood that around 1855/56 Richard and Jane were again in financial difficulties so Anna returned to Cork in Ireland.  A little while later she travelled to West Africa where she married Edward Bage in Sierra Leone before she and Edward emigrated to Australia.

 

 

 

There are in existence letters from Richard Collett sent to Anna Newsome Bage when she was living in Australia in 1857.  At that time Anna’s husband Edward Bage was the District Surveyor in Colac.  Another letter was received by Anna from a relative in Cork following the death of her auntie Jane who relayed to her that “Uncle Collett (i.e. Richard) visited us in Cork recently and looked well despite his recent bereavement”.

 

 

 

Jane Collett nee Newsome died in 1857, while her husband Richard Collett died during the following year in 1858, both of them being buried at Edmonton in London. 

 

 

 

23N10

Mary Ann Collett

Born in 1809; died in 1821

 

23N11

William Wimburn Collett

Born in 1811; died in 1821

 

23N12

Margaret Newsome Collett

Born in 1814; died in 1817

 

 

 

 

23M5

Robert Collett was born in London in 1782 and was baptised at St Andrews in Holborn on 11th September 1782.  He was the youngest son of Richard Cobb Collett and Ann Parker and tragically he died as a minor when he fell from a horse.

 

 

 

 

23N1

Kenrick William Collett was born in London on 6th October 1804 and was baptised at St Andrews in Holborn on 11th November 1804, the son of Kenrick and Mary Ann Collett.  He was educated at Eton and at Christ Church College in Oxford where he matriculated on 17th April 1823 and where the records confirm he was the eldest son of Kenrick Collett of St Andrew’s in Holborn, London. 

 

 

 

It was at Christ Church College that he later obtained his BA on 1st February 1827.  He then became a barrister-at-law at Lincoln’s Inn in 1831 and it may have been between 1827 and 1830 that he joined his father’s law firm which was renamed Wimburn, Collett & Collett, although by 1831 the company had become Wimburn, Collett & Dyson with the departure of Kenrick junior.  Kenrick William Collett eventually received his MA on 9th June 1836 and in 1855 he was made Chief Justice in Sierra Leone.  It is interesting that within the documentation listing the Alumni of Cambridge; Kenrick William Collett is recorded there achieving a BA during 1834, incorporated from Oxford.  Five years later the Electoral Roll in 1839 included the name of Kenrick Collett of Fulham, who held copyhold houses in Colehill Lane and Walham Green in Fulham, which was repeated in the Electoral Roll of 1840 but was missing in 1841.

 

 

 

Kenrick married Augusta Ann Richards before 1850 but, since all of their children were born in London and were still living there in 1881, it seems likely that Augusta did not accompany Kenrick to Sierra Leone where he died and was buried in 1856 at a time when Augusta was expecting their fourth child.  Augusta Ann Richards was born at Winchfield near Farnborough in Berkshire in 1813, but shortly after her parents John and Harriet Richards moved to London where Augusta was baptised on 1st June 1814 at Old Church in St Pancras. 

 

 

 

By 1881 Augusta was a widow and was operating a private school at 39 Peak Hill Gardens in Lewisham.  The census return described her as being sixty-seven and born at Winchfield in Berkshire.  Assisting her as live-in teachers were her two unmarried daughters Emily Collett who was 27 and born at Kennington in Surrey and Charlotte Collett who was 24 and born at Islington in Middlesex.  At that time the school comprised five young ladies from 10 to 16 years of age, all supported by one domestic servant.

 

 

 

23O1

George William Kenrick Collett

Born in 1850

 

23O2

Richard Parker Collett

Born in 1852

 

23O3

Emily Louise Collett

Born in 1854

 

23O4

Charlotte Mary Collett

Born in 1857

 

 

 

 

23N2

Henry Parker Collett, who was known as H P, was born in London on 26th September 1805 and was baptised at St Andrews in Holborn on 24th October 1805.  He was the son of Kenrick and Mary Ann Collett.  On 1st November 1826 Henry Parker Collett of Chancery Lane secretly married (1) Mary Anne Clarke of Hanbury Place at Marylebone Church.  Mary was also referred to as of Blandford Place, Regents Park.  The reason for keeping it a secret is not known, but it was only after four years had passed that they publicly announced that they were married with an item in The Times on 31st August 1830.  That marriage later produced two children for the couple. 

 

 

 

In 1841 H P took on his father’s business as an attorney with Wimburn & Collett at 62 Chancery Lane, following the death of his father Kenrick in February that year.  Also that same year H P’s brother Charles Collett (below) joined the firm.  A little while later his wife Mary Anne passed away, perhaps while giving birth to the couple’s second child, and shortly after that Henry married (2) Mary Ann Walker in 1845, the marriage producing a further three children.

 

 

 

The success of his business allowed him to take early retirement during the 1840s having already amassed a substantial fortune, leaving his brother Charles as the sole Collett family representative.  While working at Chancery Lane the family lived at 37 Gloucester Place, Portman Square in London but upon his retirement around the early part of 1846 the family moved to Yateley Hall near Farnborough in Hampshire from where the final four children were born. 

 

 

 

Tragically the couple suffered with two stillborn daughters on 13th October 1848 and 6th May 1851.  Henry also had a house at 4 Brunswick Terrace in Brighton where he died on 27th March 1855.  That was followed by the death of his wife on 14th September 1856 at Yateley Hall.  Henry’s Will, which was made on 27th July 1854, was proved on 10th May 1855 less than two months after his death, whereas his widow’s Will was proved nearly five months after her death on 9th February 1857.

 

 

 

In an extract from the diary of E. E. Lloyd dated 16th November 1856 there is a suggestion that some unpleasant news was received from the home of a relative of Mrs Henry Parker Collett which ‘appears to be a very nasty business’.  That now seems likely to have been a dispute concerning the Will of Henry Parker Collett in view of the fact that an article in The Times on 24th January 1857 related to a Prerogative Court hearing about the death and the Will of H. P. Collett.  Later that same year there were still outstanding issues with the estates of Henry Parker Collett and his second wife Mary Ann Collett, as displayed in the following notice published in July that year, as re-produced below.

 

 

 

“Pursuant to a Decree of the High Court of Chancery, made in a cause wherein Cecil Mary Collett [the eldest surviving child of H P Collett] and others are plaintiffs [her siblings], and Mary Ann Collett [their mother], since deceased, and others, are defendants, and in a cause wherein Cecil Mary Collett and others are plaintiffs, and Robert Cornelius Dixon and others, are defendants, the creditors of Henry Parker Collett, late of Yateley Hall, in the County of Hampshire, esquire, who died in or about the month of March 1855 are, by their solicitors, on or before the 7th day of November, 1857, to come in and prove their debts, at the chambers of the Master of the Rolls, in the Rolls Yard, Chancery Lane, Middlesex, or in default thereof they will be peremptorily excluded from the benefit of the said Decree.  Wednesday, the 11th day of November, 1857, at twelve o'clock at noon, at the said chambers, is appointed for hearing and adjudicating upon the claims — Dated this day 24th July 1857.”

 

 

 

It was nearly another nine years before the whole dispute was resolved, when the following notice was published in the London Gazette on 16th March 1866 relating to the 1854 Will of Henry Parker Collett.

 

 

 

“In Chancery

In the matter of an Act of Parliament made and passed in the Session of the 19th and 20th years of the reign of Her present Majesty, cap. 120, entitled "An Act to Facilitate Leases and Sales of Settled Estates" and in the matter of a certain mansion-house or messuage, with the offices, outbuildings, gardens, land and park surrounding the same, called or known by the name of Yateley Hall, situate in the parish of Yateley, in the County of Hampshire, comprising 45 acres or thereabouts, in the tenure or occupation of Francis William Medley or his under-tenants, which said hereditaments were settled by the Will of Henry Parker Collett deceased, dated the 27th day of July 1854;

 

 

 

and in the matter of certain messuages or cottages, farms, lands, and hereditaments situate in the said parish of Yateley, in the several tenures or occupations of Aaron Barlow, James Ellis, and Joseph Searle, comprising 118 acres or thereabouts, and two small pieces of land or plantation, comprising 2 acres 3 rods 15 poles or thereabouts, situate in the said parish of Yateley, and numbered 269 and 285 in the tithe map for the said parish of Yateley, and which are now in hand, all which said hereditaments were also settled by the said Will of the said Henry Parker Collett dated the 27th day of July 1854;

 

 

 

and between Cecil Mary Collett, Helena Parker Collett (now the wife of the defendant William Henry Lloyd), Catherine Ann Spencer Collett, and Horace Chambers Spencer Collett, respectively infants, by Charles William Maugham, their next friend, plaintiffs, and Mary Ann Collett, deceased, Henry Warre (since dismissed), Charles Tylecote, Richard Freeman, and Robert. Cornelius Dixon, defendants, by Original Bill and Order to Revive;

 

 

 

and between Cecil Mary Collett, Helena Parker Collett (now the wife of the defendant William Henry Lloyd), and Catherine Ann Spencer Collett, infants, by William Henry Lloyd, their next friend, plaintiffs, and Robert Cornelius Dixon, Charles Tylecote, Richard Freeman, Horace Chambers Spencer Collett, an infant, by William Henry Lloyd, his guardian, the said William Henry Lloyd, the Reverend Samuel Webb Lloyd, John Clutton, and the Reverend Henry Dyson Lloyd, defendants, by Original Bill and Order of Revivor and supplement.

 

 

 

NOTICE is hereby given, that a Petition in the above named matters and causes was, on the 28th day of February 1866, presented to the Right Honorable the Master of the Rolls, by the above-named plaintiffs, Cecil Mary Collett, Catherine Ann Spencer Collett, and the defendant Horace Chambers Spencer Collett, all of Barham, in the County of Kent, and all infants under the age of twenty-one years respectively, by the Reverend Samuel Webb Lloyd, of No. 8 Upper Seymour Street, Portman Square in the County of Middlesex, clerk, specially appointed for the purposes of the said Petition, the above-named plaintiff Helena Parker Lloyd, the wife of the defendant William Henry Lloyd, of No. 4 Victoria Square, in the County of Middlesex, gentleman, and the defendants Charles Tylecote, of Tamworth, in the County of Stafford, esquire, and Richard Freeman, of Tufnell Park West, in the County of Middlesex, gentleman, praying that the hereditaments and premises described or comprised in the first schedule to an agreement in the said Petition set forth, bearing date the 30th day of January 1866, made between the said Charles Tylecote and Richard Freeman, of the one-part, and Martin Wilkins Gell de Winton Corry, of Midhurst, in the County of Sussex, esquire, of the other part, being the said hereditaments first above-mentioned, and described as in the tenure or occupation of the said Francis William Medley or his under-tenants, might be sold to the said Martin Wilkins Gell de Winton Corry for the sum of £5,000 and that the hereditaments and premises described or comprised in the second schedule to the same agreement, being the said hereditaments secondly above mentioned, in the several tenures or occupations of the said Aaron Barlow, James Ellis, and Joseph Searle, and the said two small pieces of land or plantation, containing 2 acres 3 rods 15 poles in hand, might also be sold to the said Martin Wilkins Gell de Winton Corry for the sum of £4,365, and that all necessary parties might be directed to concur in such sales; and that the proceeds of such sales respectively, after payment of the costs, charges, and expenses of and incident to the said sales and this application, and consequent thereon, might be paid to the credit of the cause "Collett v. Collett, 1860, C. 122" to an account to be entitled "The Purchase Moneys of the Yateley Estates" or that his Lordship would be pleased to make such further or other Order in the premises as to his Lordship should seem meet.

 

 

 

And notice is hereby also given that the petitioners may be served with any Order of the Court, or notice relating to the subject of the said Petition at the office of their Solicitors, Messrs. Parker, Rooke, and Parkers situate at No. 17 Bedford Row, in the County of Middlesex — Dated this 13th day of March 1866.   Parker, Rooke, and Parkers, No. 17 Bedford Row, Solicitors for the Petitioners”

 

 

 

23O5

Henry Russell Collett

Born on 02.03.1837

 

23O6

Cecil Mary Collett

Born in 1845

 

23O7

Helena Parker Collett

Born on 06.11.1846

 

23O8

Catherine Ann Spencer Collett

Born on 06.12.1849

 

23O9

Horace Chambers Spencer Collett

Born on 11.06.1853

 

 

 

 

23N3

Mary Ann Collett was born in London on 16th May 1807 and was baptised at St Andrews in Holborn on 11th June 1807.  Her parents were confirmed at the baptism as Kenrick and Mary Ann Collett.  Mary Ann married Edmund Lloyd of Harley Street at Fulham Church on 1st June 1825.  Edmund was the brother of the Reverend Martin Lloyd who married Mary Ann’s mother, the widow Mary Ann Collett (Ref. 23M1).  Edmund Lloyd, who was the son of Edmund Lloyd and Bridget Eyre, was born on 8th September 1795 and baptised at St Marylebone Church on 2nd October 1795.

 

 

 

It is perhaps significant that their children were given second christian names that reflected other family connections associated with the Collett and Lloyd families businesses.  The same can be said of the children of Elizabeth Helen Collett (below) and John Laurie.

 

 

 

Edmund was a book seller at the shop and reading room of Lloyd & Son on the corner of Harley Street with Great Marylebone Street and to which Lady Caroline Lamb was a frequent customer in the 1820s.  Even before they were married and from the tender age of just twelve years Mary Ann Collett used to write to the Lloyd family from the Preston School for young ladies that she attended in Brighton.

 

 

 

In May 1821 Edmund, age 25, was still living with his mother Bridget who was 44 and his brothers and sisters at 64 Great Marylebone Street.  His siblings at that time were: Mary Lloyd who was 22, Rosa Lloyd who was 21, Martin Lloyd who was 15 - who later married the widow of Kenrick Collett (Ref. 23M1) and the mother of Mary Ann Collett (Ref. 23N3), Bazzett Lloyd who was 13, Ellen Lloyd who was 12, Fanny Lloyd who was nine, and Arthur Lloyd who was six years old.  Two months later in July 1821 Edmund’s eldest sister Mary Lloyd married Thomas Bent of Hillingdon at St Marylebone.

 

 

 

Following their own wedding in June 1825, which was announced in The Times, Mary Ann and Edmund spent the honeymoon in Worthing.  Just over a year later, at the time of the birth of their first child, Mary Ann and Edmund were living at York Terrace on the south side of Regent’s Park.  From 1828 to 1834 the family home was at 57 Harley Street, where in 1831 the annual rent was £160 and the rates were £32 and13 shillings.  At that time the household was made up of Mary Ann and Edmund and there four sons, Edmunds two unmarried sisters Ellen and Fanny who had lived with them since their mother’s death in 1829, plus two servants.

 

 

 

Towards the end of 1834 Edmund’s book business was in financial difficulties and was summoned to attend the bankruptcy court on 5th December with debts reputed to be upwards of £10,000.  It was around that time when the family moved to Cole Hill Cottage opposite the Bishop of London’s Walk.  Fortunately for Edmund in early 1835 he inherited £2,000 from the Will of Samuel Webb, Mary Ann’s grandfather, and a year later his wife Elizabeth Webb died leaving various sums of money to Mary Ann, husband Edmund, and their children.

 

 

 

Another move followed, that time to the Collett family home at Holcrofts in Fulham.  By then Edmund had deteriorating health and was suffering greatly from asthma.  That prompted talk of selling up and moving abroad.  Edmund’s sister Rosa was married by that time and was living in Paris as Rosa Skiers.  By 1840 the Collett family had moved abroad and had let Holcrofts to the Laurie family, forcing Edmund and the Lloyd family to move to 27 Lowndes Street in Belgravia. 

 

 

 

On 3rd October 1843 Edmund was a witness at the wedding of his sister Ellen Lloyd to Robert William Cumberpatch at Winkfield in Berkshire, with the ceremony being carried out by their brother the Rev. Martin Lloyd Rector of Depden.  In 1848 Robert and Ellen Cumberpatch were living in Turkey.

 

 

 

Between April 1844 and 1847 Edmund and Mary Ann moved house two more times.  The first time to 58 York Terrace and the second time to 8 York Place in Portman Square.  Midway between the two moves Edmund sold the book shop at 57 Harley Street to Robert Weir.  Shortly after the family moved to York Place Edmund sent sons Edmund Eyre and William Henry to Altona in Hamburg to study languages.  It was intended that they would stay there for a least a year, but they were suddenly recalled to England after just six months, probably for financial reasons.

 

 

 

Yet another move took place the following year in 1848 when the family moved to 13 Norfolk Street off Park Lane and six years later they finally left London.  Initially Edmund and Mary Ann went to live with their eldest son the Reverend Samuel Webb Lloyd at The Shrubbery in Barham near Canterbury.  By the end of 1854 Edmund and Mary Ann had settled for the time being at 2 Lounden Crescent in Dover.  In January of the next year their son Edmund Eyre Lloyd was appointed Assistant Surgeon with the East India Company and moved to live in India.

 

 

 

During the next four years Edmund’s health worsened such that in early 1860 he and Mary Ann moved back to Barham where he died on 4th June 1860.  He was buried in a vault near the west entrance to Barham Church, the vault being covered by a slab set two feet above ground level.  The Will of Edmund Lloyd was made on 12th February 1855 and left everything to his wife Mary Ann, which amounted to less than £4,000. 

 

 

 

The 1861 Census recorded that Mary Ann Lloyd, head of the household, was living at The Shrubbery in Barham at the age of 55.  Living there with her was her unmarried son William Henry Lloyd aged 30, and nieces Cecil Mary Collett who was 15, Helena Parker Collett who was 14, Catherine Ann Spencer Collett who was 11, and nephew Horace Chambers Spencer Collett who was seven years of age, the children of Mary Ann’s brother Henry Parker Collett (above).  The whole of the family was supported by five female servants and a butler.

 

 

 

Living nearby in Barham in 1861 at 6 Dussingstone Street was Mary Ann’s son Oliver Wimburn Lloyd and his three children Robert C Lloyd aged six, Emily M A F Lloyd aged five, and Oliver J H E Lloyd who was four.  Within five years Cecil Mary Collett had married Henry Dyson Lloyd and Helena Parker Collett had married William Henry Lloyd, while during the previous year Oliver Wimburn Lloyd received a loan of £1,700 from his mother.  However, on 11th July he was declared bankrupt and only two week after Mary Ann Lloyd died on 25th July 1865 at Barham.

 

 

 

In her Will she left £3,000 to her son Samuel Webb Lloyd, with the balance of her estate going to her son William Henry Lloyd, although four-fifths of the sale of 14 Hemming’s Row in St Martin’s Lane (originally owned by her father Kenrick Collett) to be shared between the four of her sons excluding Samuel.  The Will was disputed and a Bill of Complaint was filed in the High Court of Chancery on 14th November 1865, naming as defendants Edmund Eyre Lloyd, Henry Dyson Lloyd and the three children of Oliver Wimburn Lloyd who were under 21.  The result of the action is unknown, while most of the money left in the Will was used to settle the court expenses.

 

 

 

The windows in Barham Church either side of the sanctuary are dedicated to Edmund and Mary Ann Lloyd.  In the church yard there is a gravestone that is dedicated to the memory of Edmund and Mary Ann Lloyd, together with the Reverend Samuel Webb Lloyd and his wife Catherine Frances.

 

 

 

23O10

Samuel Webb Lloyd

Born on 09.06.1826; died 12.11.1886

 

23O11

Oliver Wimburn Lloyd

Born on 06.01.1828; died 24.01.1917

 

23O12

Edmund Eyre Lloyd

Born on 06.06.1829; died 08.04.1904

 

23O13

William Henry Lloyd – see 23O7

Born on 30.03.1831; died 17.11.1912

 

23O14

Henry Dyson Lloyd – see 23O6

Born on 11.09.1832; died 29.09.1923

 

 

 

This is the family line of Christopher Lloyd details of which

have been published in “The Lloyds of Harley Street, Associate Family and Friends”

 

 

 

 

23N4

John Edward Collett was born in London on 3rd February 1809 and was baptised at St Andrews in Holborn on 12th April 1809, the son of Kenrick and Mary Ann Collett.  With his past family connections he was brought up to the Law but never practised and in 1839 was Administrator at the Middle Temple.  In 1854 he went to New Zealand with the Honourable Henry Petre who held an appointment in the colony.  However, shortly afterwards he returned to England and died at Shepherd’s Bush in London aged 49 on 27th May 1859 and was buried at Kensal Green on 31st May 1859 close to the graves of Charles Matthews and Madame Vestris.

 

 

 

Published in The Times newspaper on Friday 8th March 1844 was the following article under the headline ‘The Athlone Election Committee’.  “John Collett, represented by Thomas Attree of Wimburn & Collett – conclusion of the proceedings, that John Collett Esq is duly elected a burgess to serve this present Parliament for the Borough of Athlone.”  Whether this was John Edward Collett has not been proved, although the company of Wimburn & Collett was the law firm of his father and his brothers Henry (above) and Charles (below).  John Collett, Member of Parliament for Athlone, lost his seat on 23rd July 1847 during the General Election that year.

 

 

 

 

23N5

George Frederick Collett was born in London on 27th August 1810 and was baptised at St Andrews in Holborn on 25th September 1810, the son of Kenrick and Mary Ann Collett.  Tragically he died of smallpox on his father’s birthday of 1st January 1820 and was buried in St. Andrew’s Burial Ground in Gray’s Inn Road in London.  There was a smallpox epidemic at that time and his cousins, the children of his uncle Richard Collett (Ref. 23M3) of Middle Row in Holborn, also died and were buried in St. Andrew’s Cemetery.

 

 

 

 

23N6

Charles Mynors Collett was born in London on 12th August 1812 and was the son of Kenrick Collett and Mary Ann Webb.  He was baptised later that same year at St Andrews in Holborn on 3rd November 1812.  He married Mary Ann McKenzie on 31st August 1839 at Old Church in St Pancras.  Mary Ann was the daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth McKenzie and was baptised at St Sepulchre’s Church in Holborn on 9th July 1818, having been born at Holborn in 1816 or 1817.  Within the Electoral Roll for 1839 Charles Minors (sic) Collett of 62 Chancery Lane was described as a freehold shareholder of Fulham Bridge, on and abutting the Thames. Also listed below his name was the name of Roland William Davies Collett of Holcrofts in Fulham who was also a shareholder, plus Also Kenrick Collett of Fulham who was described as having copyhold houses in Colehill Lane and Walham Green in Fulham.

 

 

 

The same information that was included in the Electoral Roll for 1839 was reproduced for 1840 and 1841 and within the census of 1841 Charles and Mary Collet (sic) both had a rounded age of 25, when they were residing at College Place in Marylebone, the census confirming that Charles was working as an attorney.  However, no record of their son has been found at this time even though he was fifteen years old in the next census of 1851.  Living not far away in the same registration district of St Pancras & Camden Town was Charles’ brother Roland Collet (sic) who was also listed as being 25.

 

 

 

Up to 1840 Charles Mynors Collett was working for his father’s company of Wimburn & Collett at 62 Chancery Lane, with whom he became a partner following the death of his father in February 1841.  It was Charles Mynors Collett who was instrumental in the publication of “Our Collett Ancestors by Peter G Laurie” which appeared in The Times on 26th August 1845.  One year earlier his law firm Wimburn & Collett changed its name to Wimburn, Collett, Laurie & Attree.  That happened during July 1844 but it was during 1847 that Charles retired, when the business practically came to an end.  Around that time he was living at Earls Court Road in Old Brompton. 

 

 

 

Charles’ name also appeared in The Times newspaper on a number of other occasions, but not for any good news.  On 29th April 1848 the paper reported on the Bankruptcy of Charles M. Collett “the bankrupt being a trader and professional man, a solicitor at Lincoln’s Inn Fields and a patented bread and biscuit maker in Lambeth and Houndsditch.”

 

 

 

By the time of the census of 1851 Charles and Mary were living at 15 Gladstone Street within the St George Southwark area of London.  Charles M Collett, age 38 and born at Holborn, was an attorney and solicitor in actual practice, while his wife Mary A Collett was 34 and from Islington.  Listed with the couple was their son Charles W M Collett who was 15 and a solicitor’s writing clerk from St Pancras, who was presumably working with his father.  That would indicated that he was born around 1836, which was three years before Charles married Mary Ann, at a time when Mary Ann would have been only 19 years of age, which raises the question, was he their base-born son, or was Charles junior the son by a previous wife who had not survived.  If the latter, then why did he carry the name McKenzie?

 

 

 

Five years later on 15th July 1856 The Times published an article relating to the Insolvent Debtors Court which started “This insolvent, Charles Mynors Collett an attorney, was opposed for Messrs Shoolbred, linen-drapers, of Tottenham-court-road”.  The complaint was that the insolvent had contracted a debt by fraud with the opposing creditors to the sum of £239.19s.10d.

 

 

 

The goods were obtained through orders given by the insolvent’s wife Mary Ann Collett.  The insolvent lived with his family in Osnaburgh Street, at the south-east corner of Regent’s Park and, according to his evidence she was only to obtain credit for £100.  It was reported in the same article that the authorities had spent many months trying to track down Charles Collett, but the insolvent was not arrested until 1st March, having eluded the Sheriff’s Officer since December 1855. 

 

 

 

The reference to Regent’s Park may well be an indicator that it was Charles Collett, age 30, who was recorded living there in the census of 1841, which raises the question where was his wife Mary Ann and his son Charles on that occasion.

 

 

 

It may have been as a direct result of their court appearance in July 1856 that, shortly after the case was settled, Charles and Mary left London and travelled north to Lancashire.  The next census in 1861 placed the couple living within the Blackburn area where Charles Collett was 48 and Mary Ann Collett was 44.  At that time they were the only two Colletts living in the Blackburn registration district, while it is now established that Charles Collett junior had married Frances Coombs four years earlier in 1857, when he was 21. 

 

 

 

Sometime during the following decade the couple return to London where they were recorded as living in 1871.  It was at Gray’s Inn Lane within the St Pancras & Tottenham Court registration district of London that Charles M Collett was 58 and his wife Mary A Collett was 54.  Ten years later, according to the census of 1881 Charles and Mary were lodging at 132 Kentish Town Road in St Pancras, the home of bricklayer George Parsons and his wife and family.  Charles Mynors Collett, age 69 and born at Holborn, was described as a solicitor out of practice, while Mary Ann Collett was 64 and was also from Holborn, rather than Islington as previously stated.

 

 

 

It would appear that Mary Ann Collett nee McKenzie died sometime during the 1880s since she was not listed with her husband in the census of 1891.  Instead it was just Charles Collett, age 78, who was recorded as living within the Holborn & Goswell Street area of London.  Six years later Charles Mynors Collett died on 12th March 1897 and it seems very likely that he may have been buried close by his brother John Edward Collett (above) who was buried at Kensal Green.

 

 

 

23O15

Charles William McKenzie Collett

Born in 1836

 

 

 

 

23N7

ROWLAND WILLIAM DAVIES COLLETT was born on 25th February 1814 and was named after his father’s partner Rowland Wimburn.  Just over a month later he was baptised at St Andrews in Holborn on 5th April 1814.  He was originally brought up within the medical profession but was subsequently called to the Bar in 1841.  In the June census of 1841 Roland Collet (sic) was 25 and was living in the St Pancras & Camden Town area of London not far from his married brother Charles (above).  It was later that same year on 17th August 1841 that Rowland married Mary Ann Edwards at Old Church in St Pancras.  Two years earlier the 1839 Electoral Roll included Roland (sic) William Davies Collett of Holcrofts, Fulham, as being a freehold shareholder, the same as stated in 1840 although not listed at all in 1841. The marriage of Rowland and Mary Ann produced six children for the couple, although three of the sons died while they were still in their teenage years.

 

 

 

Ten years later the couple were living at 4 County Terrace just off the New Kent Road in the Newington area of London to the south of the River Thames.  Rowland was 37 and his wife was eight years younger at 29.  Their children at that time were Kenrick who was eight, Francis who was six, Rowland who was five, Elizabeth who was three, and Herbert who was one year old.  Just over two years after the census day Rowland died at the comparatively early age of thirty-nine on 7th May 1853.  His Will, which was proved on 4th June 1853, confirmed his address at the time of his death as 4 Webbs County Terrace on the New Kent Road in Surrey.

 

 

 

By April 1861 Mary Ann Collett was living in the Grays Inn Lane area of St Pancras with just three of her children.  The census confirmed she was a widow at the age of 39 and the children still living with her were recorded as Kenrick C Collett who was 18, Elizabeth who was referred to as Fanny H Collett 13, and Herbert E Collett who was 11.  Three of Mary Ann’s sons eventually emigrated to Australia.  They were the oldest three boys, Kenrick, Francis, and Rowland who was found dead and buried there in very mysterious circumstances when he was only eighteen years old.

 

 

 

During her life, in addition to losing her husband when her youngest child was yet to reach one year old, Mary Ann also suffered the loss of her three youngest sons who all died during the 1860s.  By 1881 Mary A Collett was 60 when she was living at 75 Belsize Road in the South Hampstead area of London.  Living with her was her granddaughter Maud M J Fairweather, aged eleven, who was born in Monmouth and who was the daughter of Mary Ann’s only daughter Elizabeth Helen Collett.

 

 

 

23O16

Kenrick Clayton Collett

Born in 1842

 

23O17

FRANCIS ALEXANDER EDWARD COLLETT

Born in 1844

 

23O18

Rowland William Collett

Born in 1845

 

23O19

Elizabeth Helen Collett

Born in 1847

 

23O20

Herbert Evans Collett

Born in 1849

 

23O21

Murray Campbell Collett

Born in 1852

 

 

 

 

23N8

Elizabeth Helen Collett often referred to as Eliza, was born on 23rd June 1815 five days after the Battle of Waterloo.  She was baptised at St Andrew in Holborn on 26th October 1815, the daughter of Kenrick and Mary Ann Collett. 

 

Nearly twenty years later she married widower John Laurie of Harley Street on 9th July 1834 at Trinity Church, the ceremony being conducted by the Rev. Doctor Saxby Penfold.  By that time John already had a daughter Mary from his first marriage.

 

This photograph of Elizabeth Helen Laurie nee Collett is believed to have been taken around 1868.

 

 

 

Their marriage produced seven children, the youngest of which was only eight years old when John Laurie died at the family home at Hyde Park Terrace in London on 2nd August 1864.  John had been born in Scotland as John Snaddon and after a difficult start to his life he was adopted by his uncle, Sir Peter Laurie, who housed and educated him in London before setting him up in a prosperous saddlery and harness making business.  His name was changed to Laurie by royal licence in 1824.  He served as Sheriff of London and Middlesex in 1845, was Deputy Lieutenant for Middlesex in 1846 and was briefly a Member of Parliament for Barnstaple from 1854.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1881 widow Elizabeth Laurie of Fulham, aged 65, was listed as head of household at 47 Porchester Terrace in Paddington to where she had moved following the death of her husband.  Under occupation Elizabeth was described as a ‘share holder’.  The only relative living with her was three months old Kenrick Laurie, her grandson, who had been born in London.  The remainder of the household comprised: Annie Tinkurn aged 49 a widow and cook of Salisbury; Maria Goodeer aged 30 a lady’s maid from Leiston in Suffolk; Jane Weston aged 36 a housemaid; Matilda Ball aged 20 a kitchen maid of Surbiton in Surrey; John Nightingale aged 25 a footman of Walmer in Kent; and Mary Nails aged 57 a nurse from Canada.

 

 

 

Elizabeth Helen Laurie nee Collett died during 1891 and it is well known that she was much loved by Edmund Eyre Lloyd, her nephew.  As early as 1832 there had been talk within the Lloyd household that Edmund wanted to take Eliza Collett to India with him.  John Laurie was previously married in 1831 to Mary Sparkes and she and her sister Elizabeth Sparkes, who married Robert Peter Laurie (John’s brother) in 1833, had previously lived with their father Charles Sparkes at 21 Harley Street.  It was Elizabeth’s son Peter who wrote “Our Collett Ancestors” and “Robinson Crusoe Collett”.

 

 

 

23O22

John Wimburn Laurie

Born on 01.10.1835

 

23O23

Peter George Laurie

Born in 1838

 

23O24

Julius Dyson Laurie

Born on 09.12.1839

 

23O25

Arthur Henry Laurie

Born on 04.11.1841

 

23O26

Alfred St George McAdam Laurie

Born in 1847; died in 1927

 

23O27

Francis Duke Laurie

Born in 1849

 

23O28

Helen Marian Agnes Laurie

Born in 1856

 

 

 

 

23N9

Richard Fowler Collett was born at Cole Hill Cottage in Fulham on 6th January 1819 and the birth was listed in the Wednesday 13th January edition of The Times.  He was a seafarer during his early life and went to sea in the service of Honourable East India Company.  However, he subsequently quit the nautical profession and filled various appointments in London.  On 20th February 1849 he married Fanny Edwards at St Andrew’s Church in Enfield the daughter of A J Edwards of Westmoor House on Enfield Highway.

 

 

 

According to the 1881 Census the family was living at 57 Kent House Road in Lewisham.  Richard was aged 62 and born at Fulham and his occupation was simply given as ‘dividends’ which is likely to refer to his income rather than employment.  Fanny his wife was aged 57 and of an unknown London parish, while daughters Helen S Collett aged 27 and Rose M Collett aged 24 were both born at Enfield in Middlesex.

 

 

 

The family was supported by a 17 years old servant Ruth Norton of Paddock Wood in Kent and had living with them boarder John Lyz aged 22 from Brooklyn in New York who was a finance clerk with a soap manufacturer.  Richard Fowler Collett died four years later on 13th April 1885 at Lewisham.  Following his death Fanny and her daughter left London and settled in the Landport area of Portsmouth where they were living in 1891.  Fanny Collett was 67 and Rose Maria Collett was 34.  At the next two times the census was conducted for some reason Rose managed to provide incorrect details concerning her age.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1911 Fanny Collett, the widow of Richard Fowler Collett, was still residing with her unmarried daughter Rose Marion Collett in Portsmouth, Hampshire.  Fanny was 87 and had been born at Kensington in London, while Rose Collett was 51 (sic) and born in Enfield, Middlesex.  It was a similar situation ten years previously when the Portsmouth census in 1901 recorded the pair of them as Fanny Collett aged 77 and from London and Rose M Collett from Enfield who was 39 (sic), neither of them credited with an occupation.

 

 

 

23O29

Fanny Laura Collett

Born on 26.10.1850

 

23O30

Helen Sarah Collett

Born on 27.02.1854 at Enfield

 

23O31

Rose Marion Collett

Born in 1857 at Enfield

 

 

 

 

23O1

George William Kenrick Collett was born in London 1850.  He married Louise Sandys in 1878 and in 1881 they were living at 4 Waterloo Terrace in Islington, London with their daughter Violet.  George who was thirty-one and born at Marylebone was a retired mariner.  Louise was 28 and from Essex (sic), and their daughter Violet was one year old and born at Camberwell.

 

 

 

No trace of the family has been found in 1891 but by March 1901 the family of four was living at Beckenham in Kent.  George W K Collett was 51 and was a factor’s cashier from Marylebone and his wife Louise was 48 and from Henley-on-Thames.  Still living with them was their two daughters Violet M Collett who was 21 and born in Camberwell, and Helen A Collett who was 14 and born in Islington.  Sometime after that the family left Beckenham and moved back into London and in April 1911 they were living at 55 Tannsfield [or Tannsfeld] Road in Sydenham in Kent, within the Lewisham registration district of South London.

 

 

 

By that time the couple’s eldest daughter Violet had already left the family home to be married, so the family then only comprised George William Kenrick Collett of Marylebone, who was 61 and named in error as George William Kewich Collett, Louise Collett from Henley, who was 58, and Helen Augusta Collett, who was 24.

 

 

 

George and Louise were still living at 55 Tannsfield Road in Sydenham thirteen years later, when George William Kenrick Collett was admitted into Charing Cross Hospital in London, where he died on 19th April 1924 at the age of 73.  His estate was valued at the London Probate Office on 22nd May 1924 at £891 1 Shilling and 6d which was inherited by his widow Louise Collett.

 

 

 

23P1

Violet Maude Collett

Born in 1880

 

23P2

George Augustus Collett

Born in 1881; died in 1888

 

23P3

Helen Augusta Collett

Born in 1886

 

 

 

 

23O2

Richard Parker Collett was born in London on 17th December 1852 and was the son of Kenrick William and Augusta Ann Collett.  Whilst it is established that his sister Emily (below) was born in London, it cannot be explained why, following the premature death of Richard Parker Collett when he was two years old, that he was buried at Solihull on 28th December 1854.

 

 

 

 

23O3

Emily Louise Collett was born at Kennington in Surrey in 1854.  By the age of 27 she was still unmarried and was a teacher at a private school operated by her mother Augusta Collett (Ref. 23N1) at 39 Peak Hill Gardens in Lewisham.

 

 

 

 

23O4

Charlotte Mary Collett was born at Islington in Middlesex in 1857.  Curiously she was baptised at Solihull in Warwickshire on 2nd March 1859 where her parents were confirmed as Kenrick William and Augusta Ann Collett.  Just like her sister Emily Louise she was a teacher at the private school operated by her mother Augusta Collett.  And also like her sister she was unmarried at the age of 24 years.

 

 

 

 

23O5

Henry Russell Collett was born on 2nd March 1837.  He was baptised at St Mary’s Church in St Marylebone Road in London on 21st June 1837, the son of Henry Parker and Mary Ann Collett.  Sadly he died on 10th February 1852 aged 14 years.  At that time he was the only son of Henry Parker Collett.

 

 

 

 

23O6

Cecil Mary Collett was born at Yateley Hall in Hampshire in 1845.  Following the deaths of both her parents when she was around ten years old she and her three surviving sibling were taken in by their aunt.  In 1861, when Cecil Mary was 15, she was living with her three siblings at The Shrubbery in Barham with her aunt, the widow Mary Ann Lloyd nee Collett the daughter of Kenrick Collett.  In 1866 she married Mary Ann Lloyd’s son Henry Dyson Lloyd, a clergyman of Marylebone who was born in 1833.  Henry was the brother of William Henry Lloyd who married Cecil’s sister Helena Parker Collett (below). 

 

 

 

According to the 1881 Census the family was living at Strickstemming in Much Birch south of Hereford where Henry, age 48 and of Marylebone, was a clergyman without care of souls, while his wife Cecil was 35 and from Yateley, a clergyman’s wife.  Their three children at that time comprised two sons Cecil Henry Lloyd and Evelin W C Lloyd and a daughter Jane A C Lloyd all born in Shropshire.  The household was supported by a cook/domestic servant and a young male page/domestic servant.  Cecil Mary Lloyd nee Collett died in 1921.

 

 

 

23P4

Cecil Henry Lloyd

Born in 1868 at Cardeston

 

23P5

Evelin W C Lloyd

Born in 1873 at Eaton-Under-Haywood

 

23P6

Jane A C Lloyd

Born in 1877 at Wistanstow

 

 

 

 

23O7

Helena Parker Collett was born on 6th November 1846 at Yateley Hall.  By the time she was ten years of age both of her parents had died.  So in 1861 when Helena was 14 she and her two sisters and her brother (below) were living at The Shrubbery in Barham with her aunt, the widow Mary Ann Lloyd nee Collett the daughter of Kenrick Collett.  Also living there was her future husband to be, 30 years old William Henry Lloyd the son of Mary Ann Lloyd.  William Henry Lloyd was born at 57 Harley Street, Cavendish Square in London on 3rd March 1831 and was the son of Edmund Lloyd and Mary Ann Collett.  He was baptised at St Marylebone Church when his sponsors were his grandfather Kenrick Collett, his uncle Henry Parker Collett and his wife.

 

 

 

Four years later on 30th August 1865 Helena married her cousin solicitor William Henry Lloyd at St George’s Church in Hanover Square.  William was the brother of Henry Dyson Lloyd who married Helena’s sister Cecil Mary Collett (above).  After the wedding the couple took up residence at 6 Burwood place near Hyde Park where their first two children were born.  Following the upset of two failed births the family moved to Barham in Kent where the next three children were born.

 

 

 

Although their next child was born in Brighton the family home was still at Barham.  One year later the family moved to Pembury near Tunbridge Wells close by to where Helena’s unmarried sister Catherine Collett was living.  

 

 

 

The 1881 Census confirmed William H Lloyd as being aged 50 and a solicitor of St Marylebone.  His wife was listed as Helena P Lloyd aged 34 of Yateley in Hampshire.  At that time the family was living at Station Road in Pembury near Tunbridge Wells in Kent.  The household comprised the three of the four daughters and two of the three sons listed below.  The household was supported by a governess and four domestic servants.

 

 

 

The family’s next change of address took place during May 1884 when they moved to 34 Linden Road in Bedford to be close to William’s brother Edmund Lloyd.  Further moves took the family to Headcorn and Worthing, Bay Lodge in Danbury, Allington House near Devizes, and Frogmore House at Milton-Under-Wychwood from 1905 to 1908.  It was in January 1908 that William underwent a major operation and just a month later on 7th February 1908 his wife died while staying with a relative at Droitwich where she had been visiting the brine baths to ease her ailments. 

 

 

 

Her death was reported as ‘on the 7th instant at Droitwich Helena Parker the beloved wife of William Henry Lloyd of Otley House and late of Barham in Kent’.  Following her death and in poor health himself, her husband moved to Droitwich so that he could be buried next to her when he died.  William Henry Lloyd died on 17th November 1912 and was buried alongside his wife at St Andrew’s Church Cemetery in Droitwich.

 

 

 

23P7

Mary Ann Lloyd

Born on 29.07.1866 at Hyde Park

 

23P8

William Edmund Eyre Lloyd

Born on 10.11.1867 at Hyde Park

 

 

a still born son

Born on 29.11.1868

 

 

a miscarried child

Born on 27.10.1869

 

23P9

Helena Graham Lloyd

Born on 14.09.1872 at Barham in Kent

 

23P10

Kenrick Horace Lloyd

Born on 01.01.1874 at Barham

 

23P11

Camilla Parker Lloyd

Born on 17.09.1875 at Barham

 

23P12

Martin Archibald Lloyd

Born on 31.08.1878 at 12 Wilbury Rd, Brighton

 

23P13

Bridget Eyre Lloyd

Born on 12.05.1886 at 34 Linden Rd, Bedford

 

 

 

 

23O8

Catherine Ann Spencer Collett was born on 6th December 1849 at Yateley Hall.  She was five years old when her father died and the year after that her mother passed away.  In 1861 Catherine was 11 and was living with her three siblings at The Shrubbery in Barham, the home of her aunt the widow Mary Ann Lloyd nee Collett, the daughter of Kenrick Collett.  By the time of the 1881 Census she was aged 31 and was unmarried.  She was living at St Albans Lodge in Bridge Road in Speldhurst near Tunbridge Well, Kent not far from her sister Helena Lloyd (above).  In the census she was listed as having an ‘interest in property’ which presumably was where her income came from.  Also living at the lodge was a lady’s maid and cook/domestic servant.

 

 

 

Catherine never married and it was therefore as Catherine Ann Spencer Collett that she died on 29th January 1928.  Her Will was proved at Exeter on 12th March 1928 when the executors of her estate were named as George William Jackson, solicitor, and George William Archibald Jackson, solicitor, and Kenrick Lloyd, retired Major in His Majesty’s Indian Army.  Catherine’s estate amounted to £9,385 0 Shillings 4d, while her last address was given as Hydrina, Polsham Road at Paignton in Devon.

 

 

 

 

23O9

Horace Chambers Spencer Collett was born at Yateley Hall in Hampshire on 11th June 1852, the youngest child of Henry Parker Collett and his second wife Mary Ann Walker.  While he was still only two years of age his father passed away, following which his mother died when he was just four years old.  Those tragic events resulted in Horace and his three sisters being taken into the care of the aunt.  At the time of the census in 1861, when he was seven years old, he and his sisters were living at The Shrubbery in Barham with his aunt, the widow Mary Ann Lloyd nee Collett, the younger sister of his father Henry Parker Collett.

 

 

 

Horace was education at schools in Harrow and Malvern, where he was 17 in April 1871, before entering Trinity Hall College in Cambridge on 14th December 1871.  He matriculated during the following year, and obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1875.  The record held by the university at the time of his admission confirmed he was the son and heir of Henry Parker Collett of Yateley Hall in Hampshire.  It was the same year that he received his B A that he was admitted into the Middle Temple on 1st May 1875, at the age of almost 23, when he was described as being 'of Trinity Hall, and residing at 15 Lansdowne Crescent in Leamington.'

 

 

 

It was just two years later in 1877 that Horace married Annie Spedding, the daughter of Carlisle Harrington Spedding and his wife Annie.  Six years earlier Annie Spedding, age 13, was living with her four sisters at St Bees near Whitehaven, while the same census in 1871 curiously placed their parents at Muncaster to the south of Egremont, so perhaps the sisters were all attending boarding school.  

 

 

 

Four years after they were married Horace and Annie were living at 2 Oxford Park in Ilfracombe, North Devon, with their first two children, where they were recorded at the time of the census in 1881.  Horace C Collett, of no occupation, was listed as being 26 and born at Yateley in Hampshire, while Annie Collett was 22 and from Egremont in Cumberland.  Their two children were both born in London before the family moved to the West Country, and they were Louise Collett, who was two years old, and Margaret Collett who was one year old.  Although not working at that time, Horace was clearly a man of some wealth, since he was employing two servants at that time in his life.  They were Mary Keane age 26, a cook from Croyde Bay in Devon, and Eliza Tucker who was 18 and from Portsmouth, who was a general servant.

 

 

 

By the time the next census was conducted in 1891 Horace and some of his family were living at 2 Richmond Road at Pevensey on the Sussex coast between Eastbourne and Bexhill-on-Sea.  Horace Chas S Collett was 37 and from Yateley in Hampshire who was living on his own means.  His wife Annie from Egremont in Cumberland was 32 and the only child still living with them was his youngest son Joseph H J Collett who was seven years old and born at Ilfracombe.  The couple’s eldest son Horace Collett from Ilfracombe was nine years old and was a patient at the Western Hospital in Fulham, while their two daughters were being educated at a private girls school in Fulham. 

 

 

 

Rather interestingly living with the Collett family at Pevensey in 1891 were two other people recorded in error under the name of Collett.  The first was Annie’s married sister, recorded as Frances Edith H Collett who was 26 and from Cumberland, who was described as the sister-in-law to head of the household Horace Collett.  With her was her son Edwin Percy H Collett, a nephew to Horace, who was six years of age and born at St Helier on Jersey.  In 1881 Frances Edith Spedding, age 18 and from Cumberland, was living with her older sister Sarah Jane Spedding at 7 Heath Terrace in Milverton, Warwickshire.  Also living at the same address was Frances’ widowed father Carlisle Harrington Spedding who was living with his wife Annie in 1871.  However, it was at Rugby on 30th November 1884 that Frances Edith Spedding had married Edwin Dexter John Hensman.

 

 

 

Ten years later Horace’s two sons were once again living with him and his wife, while it was the couple’s eldest daughter who was a nurse working at a hospital in Yorkshire.  The couple’s other absent daughter was employed as a children’s companion in Brighton.  The census in 1901 recorded the family staying at the Lateridge Arms Inn at Irton-with-Santon near Ravenglass in Cumberland, only a few miles from where Annie had been born.  Horace C S Collet (sic) from Yateley was 46 and was still living on his own means.  His wife Annie Collet was 40, Horace C S Collet was 19 and Joseph H S Collet was 17, both of them born in Ilfracombe. 

 

 

 

From Cumberland the family sailed across the Irish Sea and settle at Newton Stewart in County Tyrone in Northern Ireland.  And it was The Cottage in Deer Park, Newton Stewart that was the family home when Horace Chambers Spencer Collett died on 7th August 1908 at 17 Claremont Street in Belfast.  He was 56 and his estate of only £25 was passed to his widow Annie through the probate process in London.  Annie Collett nee Spedding was still living at The Cottage in Deer park when she also died at 17th Claremont Street in Belfast on 9th September 1912 at the age of 50.  Her Will was proved in London on 26th February 1913 when her married daughter Cecil Louise Russell, the wife of Samuel Charles Russell, was named as the sole executor of her estate amounting to £102 1 Shilling 6d. 

 

 

 

Claremont Street lies adjacent to Belfast City Hospital so it seems right to assume that both of them were patients at the hospital when they passed away.  It may have been around the time of the death of Horace Collett or that of his wife Annie, that three of their four children emigrated to Canada, since it is known that their eldest daughter was living at Ross-on-Wye in Herefordshire at the time of the census in 1911, when she was recorded there with her husband and his elderly mother.

 

 

 

23P14

Cecil Louise Collett

Born in 1878 in London

 

23P15

Evelyn Margaret Collett

Born in 1879 at Ilfracombe

 

23P16

Horace Carlisle Spedding Collett

Born in 1881 at Ilfracombe

 

23P17

Joseph Harrington Spedding Collett

Born in 1883 at Ilfracombe

 

 

 

 

23O15

Charles William McKenzie Collett was born within the St Pancras area of London around 1836, the son of Charles Mynors Collett.  Charles Mynors was married to Mary Ann McKenzie in 1839, so it seems logical Charles William McKenzie was the base-born son of Mary Ann McKenzie, rather than the child from a previous marriage of Charles Mynors Collett.  No record of Charles junior or Mary Ann has been found within the census of 1841, while Charles Collett senior appears to have been living in the Regent’s Park area of London.

 

 

 

Ten years later in 1851 all three of them were recorded as living at 15 Gladstone Street in Southwark St George, when Charles W M Collett, age 15 and from St Pancras, was already working for his father, as a solicitor’s writing clerk, while his mother Mary was only 34.  That would indicate that Mary was around 19 years old when she gave birth to Charles, which may account for why he was a couple of years old when his parents were married in 1839.  Also living at the same address was mother and daughter Catherine Fitzmayer, age 60, a widow and a pensioner from Madeira who was described as lodger, and Mary Eliza Fitzmayer, age 34, an annuitant from Woolwich, who was a visitor.  The whole household was supported by a house servant Elizabeth Nugent from Deptford who was 25.

 

 

 

Following a fall from grace in the mid-1850s, Charles’ parents left London and moved to Blackburn in the north of England, where they were recorded in 1861.  Charles had remained in London where he married Frances Coombs on 27th August 1857 at Clerkenwell Register Office.  Both he and Frances were 21 years of age, and the same address was given for both of them, it being 13 Middleton Square in Clerkenwell.  Frances, a spinster with no occupation, was baptised at Holy Trinity Church in Dorchester, Dorset on 27th December 1835, the daughter of gentleman William Coombs by his wife Sarah Ellis.  Charles William McKenzie Collett was described as a solicitor’s managing clerk, and his father was named as solicitor Charles Mynors Collett of 13 Middleton Square.

 

 

 

Six years earlier, in the census of 1851, Fanny Coombs (Coombe) from Dorchester in Dorset had already left her family’s home, when she was working and living in the Clerkenwell St James district of London at the age of 14.

 

 

 

By the time of the census in 1861 Charles Collett from St Pancras was recorded in error as being 28, while his occupation was that of a solicitor.  He and his wife were lodging at 2 Swiss Villa in Stretford near Barton-upon-Irwell in Lancashire, the home of Thomas William Ridsdale and his family.  Charles’ wife was named in error as Francis Collett, who was correctly described as being 24 and from Dorsetshire.  New information discovered in 2013 reveals that law clerk Charles William McKenzie Collett died on 11th December 1863 while he was living at 373 Oxford Street in the City of Manchester.  His death was recorded at the register office in Chorlton, Lancashire (Ref. 8c 389) during the final three months of 1863.  His Will was proved in Manchester which named his widow Fanny Collett of Blackburn as being the sole executor.  Presumably Fanny later re-married and that is therefore the reason why no obvious record of her has been found in the census of 1871.

 

 

 

 

23O16

Kenrick Clayton Collett was born at Camden Town in London on 24th November 1842.  By 1861 he was 18 and living with his widowed mother Mary Ann Collett at Grays Inn Lane in St Pancras.  Eight years later he married Mary Crumpton at Hackney in February 1869 with whom he had three children in London before the family emigrated to Australia.  This was in some way confirmed by the census of 1871 when the couple was still living in the West Ham area of London with the first of their three English born children.

 

 

 

The census that year recorded the family as being Kenrick C Collett aged 27, his wife Mary 25, and their daughter Mary E E Collett who was one year old.  The next two children were born in London, and it seems very likely that the fourth child was born somewhere between England and Australia.

 

 

 

It was nearly five years after the 1871 Census that the Kenrick and his young family sailed from Gravesend on 15th February 1876 to Western Australia on the ship ‘Robert Morrison’, arriving at Fremantle, to the south of Perth, on 19th December 1876 with four of their children.  There were a total of 154 passengers on board the ship for the ten month voyage. 

 

 

 

Kenrick was noted as a gardener at The Canning (see also below) and was buried at the Old East Perth Cemetery.  The Canning is on the east side of Perth and may have been a reference to the Canning Vale district of the city or Canning Mills on the eastern outskirts of Perth.  Kenrick Clayton Collett died in Australia on 25th May 1912.

 

 

 

23P18

Mary Ellen Edwards Collett

Born in 1869

 

23P19

Kenrick Rowland Collett

Born in 1871 at London

 

23P20

Constance Machin Collett

Born in 1874 at London

 

23P21

Sydney Collett

Born in 1876 en route to Australia

 

23P22

Francis Albert Collett

Born in 1883 at Fremantle

 

23P23

Rose Laura Collett

Born in 1884

 

 

 

 

23O17

FRANCIS ALEXANDER EDWARD COLLETT was born in London on 12th April 1844 and was the son of Rowland William Davies Collett.  Six weeks after he was born Francis was baptised at old Church in St Pancras on 29th May 1844.  In 1851 the family was living at 4 County Terrace on the New Kent Road in Newington when Francis was six years old.  Tragically just two years later his father died at the age of thirty-nine leaving Francis to be brought up by his mother Mary Ann Collett.

 

 

 

Francis later married Laura Augusta Wedlake on 5th March 1870 at Plaistow in Sussex.  By the end of that same year the couple were living in the South Hackney area of London where the first of their seven children was born.  Francis and Laura were still living there just over a year later when their second child was born, both children then being baptised together in a joint ceremony on 2nd June 1872 at Weld Chapel in Southgate, London.

 

 

 

By the time of the birth of their next child the family was living at Marshside Close in Edmonton.  However shortly after, and around the middle of the 1870s, Francis’ work as an auctioneer took the family from London to the Isle of Guernsey where the next three children were born.

 

 

 

According to the census of 1881, the family was living a 3 St James Street in St Peter Port where Francis, who was referred to as Frank aged 37, continued his occupation as an auctioneer.  His wife Laura was 36, and their five children at that time were Mabel 10, Rowland 9, Grace 6, Herbert 3, and Murray who was one year old, the last two confirmed as having been born at St Peter Port.

 

 

 

On that occasion the Collett family was being supported by Elizabeth le Lacheur, an eighteen years old servant from St Peter Port.  One further child was born to Frank and Laura while they were still living on Guernsey and that happened almost one year later.

 

 

 

During the latter half of 1884 Frank and Laura and their six children left the Channel Islands and emigrated to Australia.  The family sailed out of London on the ship ‘Glengoil’ with forty-two passengers on board, bound for Fremantle in Western Australia where they arrived on 11.10.1884. 

 

 

 

The journey would have been difficult for the young family, but must have been particularly difficult for Laura as she was pregnant with the couple’s seventh and last child Daisy who was born at The Canning (see reference above) two weeks after they had arrived in Fremantle.  Once the family was established in Australia, Frank continued with his work as an auctioneer.

 

 

 

Francis Alexander Edward Collett died on 5th October 1891, his wife Laura having died earlier that same year in June of ‘the colonial fever’ typhoid.  The story within the family is that youngest son Hugh aged only nine was sharing his father’s bed at that time and awoke to find him dead.  It was then that his son Herbert Brayley Collett took over as head of the household.

 

 

 

23P24

Mabel Laura Collett

Born on 20.12.1870

 

23P25

Rowland Francis Collett

Born on 20.01.1872

 

23P26

Grace Marion Collett

Born on 15.09.1874

 

23P27

HERBERT BRAYLEY COLLETT

Born on 12.11.1877

 

23P28

Murray William Collett

Born on 24.02.1880

 

23P29

Hugh Collett

Born on 11.04.1882

 

23P30

Daisy Belle Collett

Born on 25.10.1884

 

 

 

 

23O18

Rowland William Collett was born in London on 17th December 1845 and was the son of Rowland William Davies Collett and Mary Ann Edwards.  When he was aged five years, at the time of the 1851, Rowland and his family were living at 4 County Terrace in the Newington area of London.  Just like his two older brothers Kenrick and Francis (above), Rowland also emigrated to Australia.  Tragically it was there in 1863 at the age of only eighteen years that Rowland died in what has been described as “suspicious circumstances”.  Following his death, he was buried at Denial Bay in South Australia on 11th March 1863.

 

 

 

 

23O19

Elizabeth Helen Collett was born in 1847 and very likely at 4 County Terrace in Newington where she and her family were lining in 1851 when she was three years old.  With her father dying in 1853 Elizabeth and two of her brothers remained living with their widowed mother.  So by 1861 Elizabeth, who was recorded as Fanny H Collett, was 13 and living at Grays Inn Lane in St Pancras.

 

 

 

As the only daughter of Mary Ann Edwards and Rowland William Davies Collett, is seems likely that during the late 1860s she married Mr Fairweather and that the couple initially settled in Monmouth.  Although no records for Elizabeth (or Fanny) Fairweather have been found it is the census of 1881 that includes the eleven years old granddaughter Maud M J Fairweather as living with Elizabeth’s widowed mother Mary A Collett at 75 Belsize Road in London.

 

 

 

The census return indicates that Maud was born at Monmouth and was one year old in 1871, 11 in 1881 (as above), and 21 in 1891 when, as Maud M J Fairweather she was living within the Barton Regis district of Gloucestershire.  In 1901 Maud is listed as being married to Edwin J Nancekievill 34 from Newport Monmouth, by which time she had two children Edwin who was four and Arthur who was one.  By the time of the census in 1911 Maud Nancekievill had been married for sixteen years and had given birth to five children, four of whom were still alive.  The death of Nancekievill was recorded at the Newport, Gwent register office (Ref. 8c 197) during the second quarter of 1948 when she was 79.

 

 

 

 

23O20

Herbert Evans Collett was born in 1849 when his family was living at 4 County Terrace just off the New Kent Road in the Newington.  And it was there also the family was living in March 1851 when Herbert was one year old.  It would seem as though Herbert was in the process of emigrating to Australia, like other members of his family, when he died at sea off Ascension Island in 1864.

 

 

 

 

23O21

Murray Campbell Collett was born at 4 County Terrace off New Kent Road in Newington, London on 5th August 1852.  Not long after he was born there was a succession of deaths within the family.  The first of these was his father Rowland Collett who died in 1853 aged 39 when Murray was only one year old.  Next to die was Murray’s two older brothers Rowland Collett junior in 1863 aged 18, followed by Herbert Collett in 1864 aged 15.  It was during the last three months of 1872 that Murray Campbell Collett married Rebecca Farrer, the event being recorded at Bethnal Green register office (Ref. 1c 871).  The two witnesses were Mary Sarah Duke and John Thomas Bowsher.  The couple was only married for a short while, when Murray Campbell Collett died in London during the summer of 1879, his death being recorded at the St Saviour Southwark register office (Ref. 1d 51) in the third quarter of that year.  No record of his widow has been found in the 1881 Census or any later census, perhaps indicating that she had remarried following the death of her young husband.

 

 

 

 

23O22

John Wimburn Laurie was born at the family home in Harley Street on 1st October 1835, the first born child of Elizabeth Helen Collett and John Laurie.  He fought in the Crimean War, was commanding militia in Nova Scotia at the time of the American Civil War and was the senior officer involved in the Canadian North-West Rebellion of 1885.  He rose to the rank of Lieutenant General and served as Member of Parliament for Shelburne in the Canadian House of Commons from 1887 to 1891).  On his return to England he served in the British House of Commons, representing Pembroke and Haverfordwest from 1895 to 1906 and was the Mayor of Paddington in London during 1907.  It was five years later that John Wimburn Laurie died in 1912.

 

 

 

 

23O23

Peter George Laurie was born at Holcrofts in Fulham during 1838 and he died in 1912.  He was in Hong Kong when he married Emily Ann Smale at St John’s Cathedral on 2nd September 1868.  At an earlier time he was a civilian in the Crimea during the latter stages of the Crimean War and later travelled to Hong Kong where he joined Jardine Matheson & Company at the time of the second Opium War.  He and Emily retired to Essex in 1876 when Peter was only 38 years of age.  He subsequently filled his time as an enthusiastic local historian and writer for private publication.

 

 

 

It was Peter George Laurie who wrote “Our Collett Ancestors” in 1898, copies of which are held at the Guildhall and the British Library in London.  Two years later in 1900 he published for private circulation the tragic story of John Collett (Ref. 23K2) which he entitled “Robinson Crusoe Collett” and which has been serialised in the Monthly Collett Newsletter.  John Collett was the brother of Peter’s great great grandfather Richard Cobb Collett.

 

 

 

 

23O24

Julius Dyson Laurie was born at the family home at Munster House, Holcrofts in Fulham on 9th December 1839.  He arrived in the Crimea in 1855 as a 15 year-old Lieutenant in time to be wounded in the leg in the final attack on Sevastopol.  Despite serious infection, he survived to travel home via Florence Nightingale’s hospital at Scutari.  Following the Indian Mutiny in 1857, his regiment was rushed to Cawnpore where he fought in the final relief of Lucknow.  Served in India and Afghanistan from 1875 to 1885, retiring as Colonel with The Border Regiment.  He died at his home in Gloucester Place, London, on 19th December 1909.

 

 

 

He was first married to (1) Beatrice Margaret Northall-Laurie on 2nd June 1869 when Beatrice was 23 and he was 29.  Their marriage lasted ten years when Beatrice died in India on 8th December 1879.  Many years later he married (2) the Honourable Gwen Gertrude Mary Molesworth at St luke’s Church in Chelsea on 9th May 1906.  Gwen was born at 7 Castle terrace in West Cowes on the Isle of Wight on 4th November 1865.  They were only married for three years when Julius died at 111 Gloucester place in London on 19th December 1909.  His widow survived him by forty-two years, when she died on 12th March 1951 at The Clock House in Byfleet, Surrey, following which she was buried at Wimborne Cemetery in Bournemouth.

 

 

 

 

23O25

Arthur Henry Laurie was born at the family home at Munster House in Fulham on 4th November 1841.    It was on 12th September 1866 that he married Matilda Wahab at St John’s Church in Secunderabad in India.  Sadly it was only six years later at Deesa in India when he was serving as a Captain in the Saugor Field Division of the Indian Army that on 17th April 1872 he and another officer were murdered by a deranged European soldier in his Regiment.

 

 

 

 

23O26

Alfred St George McAdam Laurie was born in 1847 and he married Ellen Catherine Dawson at St Thomas’ Church in Portman Square in London on 4th July 1871.  They lived at Sevenoaks in Kent from where Alfred worked in the City of London.  He was a Justice of the Peace in 1897 and a Queens Counsel in 1902.  When the first municipal – rather than national – telephone service was introduced at Tonbridge in 1901, Alfred had the distinction of being allocated the number ‘Sevenoaks 1’.  His eldest son, Lt. Col. Sir John Dawson Laurie was Lord Mayor of London in 1940, while his fourth son, Major-General Sir Percy Laurie KCVO, CBE, DSO after distinguished service in WW1, became Assistant Commissioner ‘D’ with the Metropolitan Police from 1933 to 1936 and was recalled from retirement in 1940 to become Provost-Marshal for the United Kingdom.  Alfred St George McAdam Laurie died in 1927

 

 

 

 

23O27

Francis Duke Laurie was born during 1849, the youngest son of John and Elizabeth Laurie.  He later emigrated to Canada, most likely guided by his elder brother John, where he married Joanna Archibald.  He became the superintendent of the Intercolonial Railway in Canada and was the Mayor of New Glasgow in Nova Scotia in 1898.  It was at Halifax in Nova Scotia that he died in 1900.

 

 

 

 

23O28

Helen Marian Agnes Laurie was born in 1856, the last child of Elizabeth Helen Collett and her husband John Laurie.  She was born after her three brothers John, Peter and Julius had returned from their respective involvements in the Crimean War.  It was in 1882 that she married Colonel Charles Bradford-Brown of 8th Regiment of Foot at Holy Trinity Church in Paddington.  The marriage produced no children for the couple who lived at Northiam in East Sussex, while it is known that Helen died in 1939.

 

 

 

 

23O29

Fanny Laura Collett was born on 26th October 1850, and that may have been in Enfield where he two younger sisters were both born.  She married John Dag on 14th November 1879 and left England to live in Ireland.  Sadly the marriage was less than eighteen months old when Fanny died in Limerick on 6th May 1881.

 

 

 

 

23O30

Helen Sarah Collett was born in Enfield in London on 27th February 1854 and was the daughter of Richard Fowler Collett and Fanny Edwards.  In 1881 she was 27 and was still living with her parents at 57 Kent House Road in Lewisham.  Three years later in 1884 Helen married Edmund Joseph Clark who was born in Portsmouth in 1854, the son of miller Edward Clark and his wife Fanny.  Their wedding also took place in Hampshire. 

 

 

 

The marriage produced a son for Helen and Edmund who was born at Southsea in 1886 and, who in 1901 at fourteen years of age was living with his grandparents at Curdridge in Southampton.  At that time Helen S Clark of Enfield and her husband Edmund were both 46 and living on their owns means in Portsmouth.  What happened to Edmund during the first ten years of the new century is not known, except that Helen Sarah Clark aged 53 and from Enfield and her son Douglas Richard Clark aged 24 were living alone at Steyning in Sussex.

 

 

 

Helen Sarah Clark nee Collett died at Southsea on 20th July 1919 and her Will was proved at London on 5th November 1919.  The Will of Helen Sarah Clark of 3 Nettlecombe Avenue in Southsea, the wife of Edmund Clark, named the sole executor as Douglas Richard Clark, a gentleman of independent means, her personal effects amounting to £1,377 7 Shillings 7d.  Her husband survived her by eighteen years, with Edmund Joseph Clark passing away at the age of 82 on 11th March 1937.  His death was recorded at Portsmouth register office (Ref. 2b 938).  By that time in his life he had amassed a considerable fortune as indicated by the probate of his Will which stated that his address was 131 High Street in Portsmouth, and that the executors of his Will were Cassandra Mary Clark, widow, and John Fulton Houston, dental surgeon, and George Bramsdon Addison, solicitor.  His personal estate was valued at £10,307 3 Shillings 4d.  It is interesting that George Bramsdon Addison had married Emily Clark at Kensington in London just seven years earlier during the last three months of 1930.

 

 

 

 

23P1

Violet Maude Collett was born at Camberwell in the spring of 1880.  Although no trace of Violet or her family has been found in 1891, by March 1901 Violet M Collett of Camberwell was twenty-one and was with her family living in Beckenham in Kent where she was working as a solicitor’s clerk.  She married Henry Francis Parfitt during the first decade of the new century and by April 1911 Violet Maude and Henry Francis Parfitt were both thirty-one and were living in the Bromley area of Kent. 

 

 

 

Violet Maude Parfitt nee Collett died on 18th January 1946 at the age of 65, and was buried at Beckenham Crematorium in Elmers End Road, Beckenham, Kent.

 

From the information on the headstone on the right, it can be seen that Henry Francis Parfitt was born on 25th December 1879, and died two days before his ninety-third birthday.

 

It can perhaps also be assumed that, following the passing of Violet, Henry took up with Helen Augusta Smith who was born on 9th October 1886, and who also died in the 1970s.

 

 

 

 

23P3

Helen Augusta Collett was born at Islington in 1886 and her family’s whereabouts in 1891 has not been determined.  However, according to the census of 1901, Helen A Collett was fourteen and was living with her family at Beckenham in Kent.  During the next decade her sister Violet (above) was married and Helen’s parents moved back into London.  In 1911 they were living in the Lewisham area of the city and living with them was Helen Augusta Collett who was twenty-four.

 

 

 

During the following year Helen married John Ernest Smith, but tragically he was killed during the fighting at Ypres on 10th August 1917.  John was the son of Frederick George and Ellen Smith of St Michael’s Road at Aigburth in Liverpool.  He was Private 44846 with D Company 11th Battalion Royal Fusiliers.  At the time of his death he was 32 and his name appears on Panel 6 of the Menin Gate Memorial at Ypres.  As his next-of-kin, Helen was listed in the military records as living at 55 Tannsfield Road in Sydenham, London.

 

 

 

23Q1

George Ernest Collett Smith

Born in 1913

 

23Q2

John Frederick Sandys Smith

Born in 1915

 

 

 

 

23P14

Cecil Louise Collett was born in London during 1878, the eldest of the four children of Horace Chambers Spencer Collett and his wife Annie Spedding.  It was at 2 Oxford Park in Ilfracombe that as Louise Collett, age two years, was living with her family in 1881.  That was the last occasion when she was named as Louise, thereafter she was known as Cecil.  Over the following years Cecil and her sister Evelyn (below) were admitted to a private girls school in Fulham where they were recorded at the time of the next census in 1891.  The school at 23 Charlville Road in Fulham was run by Rebecca Douglish, age 37, who husband Algernon was a collector for the Aerated Bread Company.  Cecil Collett from London was 12 years of age, while her sister was 11, both of them described as school boarders.

 

 

 

Upon completing her education Cecil entered the world of nursing and by March in 1901 she was working as a nurse at a hospital in Yorkshire at the age of 22.  On that occasion she was named as Cecil Louise Collett from Maddox Street in London.  A few years later her parents left Cumberland, where they were staying in 1901, and made a new home at Newton Stewart in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland.  Cecil may have joined them there, where it is likely she met her future husband, Dublin born Samuel Charles Russell. 

 

 

 

According to the census in 1911 Cecil Louise Russell from London was 31 when she was living at Ross-on-Wye in Herefordshire with her much older husband.  Samuel Charles Russell from Dublin was 48 and living with the couple was Samuel’s mother, Sarah Russell from Dublin who was 93.  In 1881 Sarah Russell, age 61, was living at 10 South parade in Portsea, Hampshire, where she was described as an annuitant and the widow of a Major in Her Majesty’s Army.

 

 

 

Cecil’s mother was still living in County Tyrone during 1912 when she died at Belfast City Hospital during the summer of that year.  Following her death it was her eldest daughter Cecil Louise Russell who was named as the sole executor of her estate of just over £100.  With Cecil’s husband being that much older, it is possible that he passed away during the next few years, at which time Cecil was reunited with her three siblings who had already emigrated to Canada.

 

 

 

 

23P15

Evelyn Margaret Collett was born in 1879 and that event may have taken place in London immediately prior to the family moving to Ilfracombe in Devon.  What is known is that her birth was recorded at nearby Barnstable register office (Ref. 5b 381) during the first quarter of 1880.  It was for this reason that her place of birth was given as Ilfracombe in subsequent census returns.  It was as Margaret Collett who was one year old in the Ilfracombe census of 1881 that she was living with her family at 2 Oxford Park in the town.  Later on in that decade Margaret, who was subsequently only known as Evelyn Collett after 1881, and her older sister Cecil (above) were sent to school at 23 Charlville Road in Fulham when the girls’ parents were living on the south coast in Sussex.  At that time in her short life boarder Evelyn Collett from Ilfracombe was 11.

 

 

 

Having completed her education Evelyn returned home to the family in Sussex from where she became a children’s companion for the six Locock children.  That was confirmed in the census of 1901 when Evelyn Collett, age 20 and from Ilfracombe, was working and living at 20 Sussex Square in Brighton with the six named children, who had six domestic servants looking after them in the absence of the children’s parents.  Not long after that it would appear that Evelyn and her two brothers left England when they emigrated to Canada.  That very likely happened after the deaths of their father in 1908 as no record of the three of them has been found anywhere in the census of 1911.

 

 

 

 

23P16

Horace Carlisle Spedding Collett was born at Ilfracombe during the summer of 1881, his birth being recorded at Barnstaple register office (Ref. 5b 472) during the third quarter of the year under the name Horace Carlisle S Collett.  He was the third child and eldest son of Horace and Annie Collett.  Horace may not have been a healthy child since in 1891 he was a patient at the Western Hospital of Infectious Diseases at Seagrave Road in Fulham, while his two older sisters were receiving their education at a nearby school in Fulham.  The census return for the hospital included the name of Horace Collett from Ilfracombe who was nine, one of 77 male patients.  There were also 101 female patients, the total number of patients being looked after by 77 nurses and 12 doctors/surgeons.

 

 

 

He obviously recovered from his illness and rejoined his family which, by then, was residing at 2 Richmond Road in Pevensey to the east of Eastbourne.  From Sussex the family eventually moved north to Cumberland where Horace’s mother had been born, and in 1901 Horace C S Collet (sic) from Ilfracombe was 19 when he and his brother Joseph (below) were with their parents who were staying at the Latridge Arms Inn in Irton-with-Santon in Cumberland.  Seven years later Horace’s father died in Belfast and it was shortly after that when he and his brother Joseph emigrated to Canada where they were later joined by their sisters.  It was either Horace or Joseph who had a son Basil Collett – see below for details, although it is highly likely that Leicester Carlisle Angus Collett who was born around 1915 was the son of Horace Carlisle Spedding Collett.  It was also in Canada at Kelowna where Horace Carlisle Spedding Collett died on 26th October 1975 at the age of 94.

 

 

 

A letter written from Ottawa in 1982 by the son of either Horace or his brother Joseph confirmed that the two brothers and their two sisters emigrated to Canada in the early 1900s, also indicated by the absence of three of the siblings from the census in 1911.  Only the brother’s eldest sister Cecil was still living in England at that time.  The letter dated 19th March 1982 and typed by E B Collett of 345 Second Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario, K1S 2J1 is reproduced in full below, from which it is hoped that one day in the future we will be able to add more details about what happened to the four siblings.

 

 

 

Dear Mr Carlsen

     Please let me introduce myself.  Some years ago we met in NATO when you were attending the NATO Defence College and I was serving on the IMS in Brussels.  You asked if I was related to the Colletts of Norway.  At that time I had to reply in the negative but I believe I told you that I was interested in my genealogy.

     Since then I have been slowly tracing the family back and, last month during a visit to London, I made a significant breakthrough.  I found in the British Library a 49 page book published in 1898 by P G Laurie entitled ‘Our Collett Ancestors’.  I have enclosed a photocopy of the chapter which links my branch of the Collett family with the Norwegian family as well as a copy of the family tree.

     I have taken the liberty to add my own research in which I am a descendent of Henry Parker Collett.  The only male descendent of this gentleman was my grandfather and all of his offspring came to Canada in the early 1900s.  My father and a sister settled in Kelowna, British Columbia, the other brother served in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and the other sister married a Mounted Police Officer.  Unfortunately that generation has died but I believe all their children still reside in Western Canada, except for myself.

 

     As you so kindly gave me your card at our first meeting, I thought that I would ask you to put me in contact with a member of the Collett family who, like myself, might be interested in our common ancestry.  I fully realize that many people are not interested in the past but perhaps you may find one who is interested and in that way we may bring the Norwegian and Canadian branches of the Collett family together.

     I have been back in Ottawa since 1980 after three very enjoyable years in Brussels.  We are just now recovering from a long cold winter which gives us all reason to recall those days and in particular those visits to the College in Rome.

     I sincerely trust that my request will not cause you too much inconvenience but I am sure you can understand my interest.  I will be most grateful for any help that you might be able to provide.

I remain yours respectfully,  (signed Basil Collett) EB Collett

 

 

 

23Q3

E Basil Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

23Q4

Leicester Carlisle Angus Collett

Born circa 1915

 

 

 

 

23P17

Joseph Harrington Spedding Collett was born at Ilfracombe in 1883, the final child of Horace Chambers Spencer Collett and Annie Spedding.  His birth was recorded at Barnstaple register office (Ref. 5b 454) as Joseph Harrington S Collett during the third quarter of the year.  The family’s time at Ilfracombe may have been short-lived when possibly mid-decade they moved to Sussex and in 1891 they were living at 2 Richmond Road in Pevensey near Eastbourne, where Joseph H S Collet from Ilfracombe was seven years old and the only one of the four siblings living with his parents.  Ten years after that Joseph, his brother Horace (above) and their parents were staying in Cumberland at the Latridge Arms Inn in Lawton where Joseph H S Collett was 17 with no occupation.  It seems likely that he and his family were preparing for a new life in Northern Ireland to where his parents eventually moved and where they both died, his father in 1908 and his mother in 1912.

 

 

 

It may have been after the death of his father that the two brothers emigrated to Canada where around 1912 or 1913 Joseph married Frances Gertrude with whom he had a son who was born in 1914.  Tragically that same son saw active service during the Second World War when he was a sergeant and an air gunner with the Royal Canadian Air Force and, at the age of 29, he was wounded in action and died on 12th May 1943 and was buried at Stratford-upon-Avon.  The inscription on his gravestone reads: Royal Canadian Air Force – son of Joseph Harrington Spedding Collett and Frances Gertrude Collett, husband of Stelle Elizabeth Collett of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

 

 

 

23Q5

Joseph Harrington Collett

Born in 1914 in Canada

 

 

 

 

23P18

Mary Ellen Edwards Collett was born in 1869 in London and was one year old at the time of the census of 1871 when she and her parents were living in the West Ham area of the city.  During the next five years two more siblings were born into the family while they were still living in London, following which the family then sailed to Western Australia on the ship ‘Robert Morrison’.  By the time they arrived at Fremantle on 19th December 1876 another sibling had been added to the family, and a further two were added some years later to complete the family.  The only other fact known about Mary is that it was in Fremantle that she married Peter John G Hawley in 1893.

 

 

 

 

23P23

Rose Laura Collett was born at Perth in 1884, and was baptised at Fremantle in Western Australia on 28th May 1884

 

It is possible that she was born while her parents were living at The Canning – a reference to The City of Canning in Perth. 

 

When she was twenty-two years of age Rose married John August Hedlund from Brafors in Sweden.  The wedding was a grand occasion which took place at Perth in August 1906.

 

 

This photograph of the bride and groom is an extract from a much larger picture which included all of the wedding guests.

 

 

 

The marriage produced two daughters for the couple while they were living in Perth.  The first was Hilda who was born on 29th April 1909 and the second was Thelma who was born in 1911.  Sadly for Rose she discovered too late that Johan was an abusive man and they were later divorced, following which he ‘stole’ the children from Rose and took them to Sweden telling them that their mother had died.  Rose and Johan lived at 12 Francis Street in Perth and in November 1912 Rose asked the court for a judicial separation on the ground of cruelty.  Pending the hearing, the children were placed under the control of the state.  The court denied the separation and Rose was forced to return to live with her husband.

 

 

 

That made life even more difficult for Rose and on the 21st January 1913 an order was made in the Perth Police Court granting her a divorce from Johan on the ground of cruelty.  As both parents claimed custody of the two girls, Hilda and Thelma were placed at the Anglican Orphanage on Adelaide Terrace in Perth to where both parents were given visiting rights.  Johan continued with his forceful attitude to secure sole custody of the children which he finally won, but only on the basis that he agreed to allow their mother full visiting rights at all times.  He never had any intention to keep his promise to the Court and in April 1914 he and the children ‘disappeared’ to Sweden.  For whatever reason, Johan and the girls returned to Perth one year later at which point he placed them once again in the Anglican Orphanage, but giving firm orders that their mother was not to be allowed access to them.

 

 

 

By that time Rose had left Perth and was living with her sister in the country and refused to inform Johan of her whereabouts.  That angered Johan who demanded to know her address.  During 1916 Rose applied to the Supreme Court to try to get access to her children, which resulted in her being given full access at all times.  It was as a result of that ruling that Johan finally decided to return to Sweden, taking Hilda and Thelma with him, and leaving Rose never to see her daughters ever again.

 

 

 

Rose Laura Hedlund nee Collett eventually died in Australia on 11th June 1942 aged 58.  He ex-husband Johan August Hedlund had died during the previous year on 11th February 1941.  The news of the death of Rose was sent in a letter to her daughter Hilda by Hilda’s cousin May Hawley in Australia.  May was the daughter of Peter John G Hawley and Mary Ellen Edwards Collett (above, i.e. Rose’s sister).  In the letter May explained that Rose had died peacefully of a heart condition caused by years of suffering with rheumatic fever.

 

 

 

Of Rose’s two daughters, Hilda went on to marry Gunnar Folke Perling on 24th December 1933 but died in 1944, while Thelma married Nils Oscar Stanser on 25th July 1942 ironically just after her mother had died, although she had been led to believe by her father that she had died over twenty-five years earlier.  Hilda and Gunnar had three sons, Gunnar Magnus, Leif Folke, and Lars Anders, and died during the birth of the latter.  And it was Leif’s daughters Karin of Motala in Sweden (born 14th March 1968) and Ingrid of Norrkoping (born 2nd March 1972) who kindly provided details of the Swedish side of the family.

 

 

 

With so many unanswered questions about Hilda’s and Thelma’s early life, Gunnar the eldest son of Hilda travelled to Australia several times with his wife to found out what had actually happened to his grandmother Rose Laura Hedlund.  Tragically on one such visit in 1992 he died of a heart-attack during the return flight home to Sweden.

 

 

 

The marriage of Thelma and Nils produced a son Goran Stanser who was born on 15th July 1943 and who was later married and had two daughters Susanne born on 7th September 1963 and Jenny who was born on 12th September 1971.  The various documents from the court proceedings are included in an appendix at the end of the family line.  All of this information, together with the aforementioned detailed papers from the court proceedings, was kindly provided by Jenny Stanser of Stockholm, the great granddaughter of Rose Laura Collett.

 

 

 

 

23P24

Mabel Laura Collett was born at South Hackney in London on 20th December 1870 and was baptised at Weld Chapel in Southgate on 2nd June 1872 in a joint ceremony with her brother Rowland (below).  When she was around five years of age her family left London and moved to Guernsey in the Channel Islands.  By the time she was fourteen the family had emigrated to Australia, having arrived in Fremantle on 11th October 1884.  It was at Maddington in Perth in Western Australia, that Mabel married John James Harris in November 1892 but tragically she died shortly after on 24th February 1893 while still at Maddington.  John Harris was born in Perth on 2nd August 1864 and died at Maddington on 19th January 1929.

 

 

 

 

23P25

Rowland Francis Collett was born at South Hackney in London on 20th January 1872 and was later baptised on 2nd June 1872 with his sister Mabel (above) at Weld Chapel in Southgate.  By 1876 Rowland and his family were living at St Peter Port on Guernsey, but in 1884 they emigrated to Australia.  And it was in Australia at Perth that he married (1) Louise Allen in 1894 with whom he had one daughter.  Fourteen years later in 1908 Rowland married (2) Louisa Frances Long.  That marriage produced six daughters and three sons for Rowland and Louisa.

 

 

 

Rowland later saw active service during the First World War and died at Ipswich in Queensland, Australia on 14th October 1945.  His entry in the Service Records of the National Archives of Australia (www.naa.gov.au) for WWI confirms that: he was born at London in England (rather than Guernsey); he enlisted at Brisbane in Queensland; his service number was 618; and his wife and next-of-kin was Louisa Frances Collett.  He also had a role in the Second World War from 1940 to 1947 although, because of his advancing years, that was very likely to have been a ‘home based’ service.  The entry in the Service Records for WWII confirms that: he was born in London; he enlisted at Redbank in Queensland; his service number was Q/164787; and his wife and next-of-kin was Louisa Collett.

 

 

 

 

23P26

Grace Marion Collett was born at Marshside in the Edmonton district of London on 15th September 1874.  Shortly after she was born the family moved from London and settled at St Peter Port on the island of Guernsey where they living until the middle of 1884.  By the end of 1884 Grace and her family were settled in Perth in Western Australia where in 1906 she married the much younger James Christopher Hennessey.  Sadly she died at Goomalling in Western Australia on 12th July 1910 during childbirth.  James Christopher Hennessey was born in Ireland in 1883 and died at Goomalling on 13th February 1945.

 

 

 

 

23P27

HERBERT BRAYLEY COLLETT was born at St Peter Port on Guernsey on 12th November 1877 and in April 1881 he was three years old and was living with his family at 3 St James Street in St Peter Port.

 

One month before his seventh birthday he and his family arrived in Fremantle in Western Australian, having sailed there from London on the ship ‘Glengoil’.

 

He attended Perth Grammar School and on leaving school he started work at the Public Library on 7th October 1891.  Two years later in 1894 and at the age of sixteen, he joined the Metropolitan Rifle Volunteers as a private, but continued to work in the library where he was appointed sub-librarian in October 1897.

 

 

 

His promotion through the various grades to the higher rank of Lieutenant Colonel was singularly rapid.  He appeared in Orders as Corporal in 1897, as Sergeant in 1898, as gazetted Lieutenant in 1899, and received his captaincy in 1900.  The next milestone in his life was his marriage to Ann E Whitfield which took place at the cathedral in Perth in 1904.  And it was also at Perth that all of the couple’s children were born.  Annie Whitfield was the eldest daughter of Mr T Whitfield of West Perth.

 

 

 

Two years after he was married, Herbert attained his Majority and two years later he received his commission Lieutenant Colonel.  When that happened he became the youngest officer in the Empire to reach that rank.  He later saw service during the first world war and was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel with 28th Battalion on 23rd April 1915 prior to embarkation on 29th June 1915.  Two months were spent training in Egypt before moving on to Gallipoli where they arrived on 10th September 1915.  28th Battalion then moved north to France where in 1916, between 28th July and 6th August, they took part in the major battle at Pozieres.

 

 

 

On 15th October 1917 he was put in temporary command of 7th Brigade Headquarter and on 27th March 1918 he was made temporary Colonel of No. 2 Command Depot which became a permanent appointment on 1st June that same year.  He was mentioned in despatches for ‘special meritorious service’.  It is also known that he was in London in late 1918 during his demob leave and that his appointment was finally terminated on 7th September 1919 when 28th Battalion was disbanded.  His military record is headed ‘Colonel Herbert Brayley Collett CMG, DSO, VD’.

 

 

 

A few years later in 1922 Herbert wrote a book about the First World War entitled “The 28th – A record of War Service with the Australian Imperial Force 1915 – 1919 Volume 1”.  He later became a freemason and patron of the Totally and Permanently Disabled Soldier’s Association of Australia.  He entered the world of politics as a liberal and from 1933 to his death in 1947 he was Senator for Western Australia with the National United Australia Party. 

 

 

 

Herbert Brayley Collett died on 17th August 1947 at Mount Lawley in Western Australia.  His entry in the Service Records of the National Archives of Australia (www.naa.gov.au) confirms he was born in the Channel Isles and was a Colonel married to Annie E Collett.  In his obituary he was referred to as Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert Brayley Collett second son of the late Francis A E Collett of Perth. 

 

 

 

23Q6

Herbert Thomas Wedlake Collett

Born in 1905; died in 1911

 

23Q7

FRANCIS MURRAY GRAHAM COLLETT

Born on 13.04.1906

 

23Q8

Lawrence Milburn Brayley Collett

Born on 23.12.1908

 

 

 

 

23P28

Murray William Collett was born at Guernsey on 24th February 1880 and saw active service in the Boer War, during which he died.

 

 

 

 

23P29

Hugh Collett was born at Guernsey on 11th April 1882 and he married Esther M Jackson.  It is known that he saw active service during the First World War and perhaps even the Boer War.  His entry in the Service Records of the National Archives of Australia (www.naa.gov.au) confirms that: he was born in the Channel Isles; he enlisted at Perth; his service number was 716; and his wife and next-of-kin was Esther M Collett.  Hugh Collett died on 8th August 1958 at East Perth in Western Australia.

 

 

 

23Q9

Daisy Collett married Thomas Flynn

Date of birth unknown

 

23Q10

Mervyn Collett married Pearl

Died in 1976

 

23Q11

Kenneth Collett

Date of birth unknown

 

23Q12

Hugh Collett married Martha

Born in 1903

 

23Q13

Laura Mary Mabel Collett

Born in 1904; died in 1913

 

23Q14

Joseph James Kelvin Collett

Born in 1906; died in 1979

 

23Q15

Francis Collett

Born in 1907; died in 1907

 

23Q16

Murray William Collett

Born on 13.01.1909

 

23Q17

Herbert Brayley Collett

Born on 02.08.1913

 

23Q18

Francis Edward Collett

Born in 1920

 

 

 

 

23P30

Daisy Belle Collett was born on 25th October 1884.  She married Hialmar E Boge in 1910 and died on 21st August 1967 at Hollywood in Western Australia having had no children.

 

 

 

 

23Q1

George Ernest Collett Smith was born in 1913.  He married Cecilia Williams in 1937 and served as a gunner in the 302nd Battery HAA Regiment during the Second World War.  He later worked as a partner solicitor with the form of Herbert Smith in London.  George, who in the 1990s was living at Rotherfield, carried out extensive research into the Collett family.

 

 

 

23R1

Michael John Henry Smith

Born in 1938

 

23R2

Charles George Stephen Smith

Born in 1942

 

23R3

Jennifer Jane Smith

Born in 1945

 

 

 

 

23Q4

Leicester Carlisle Angus Collett was born in Canada around 1915, the likely son of Horace Carlisle Spedding Collett, although no actual birth or baptism record has so far been found.  Leicester later married Betty Goodwin with whom he had one known child who suffered a premature death.  Son Michael was only nine years old when he died at the Okanagan Mission in British Columbia on 1st August 1956.  Leicester Carlisle Angus Collett was 72 when he died at Kelowna on 25th July 1987.

 

 

 

23R4

Michael Leicester Collett

Born on 08.06.1947 at Kelowna

 

 

 

 

23Q7

FRANCIS MURRAY GRAHAM COLLETT was born at Perth on 13th April 1906 and he married Estelle Redgrave in 1935.  He joined the armed forces at the outbreak of the Second World War.  His entry in the Service Records of the National Archives of Australia (www.naa.gov.au) confirms that: he was born at Perth; he enlisted at Narrogin in Western Australia; his service number was W/74223; and his wife and next-of-kin was Estelle Collett.

 

 

 

23R4

DOROTHY ESTELLE COLLETT

Born in 1936

 

23R5

Peter Graham Collett

Born in 1939

 

 

 

 

23Q8

Lawrence Milburn Brayley Collett was born on 23rd December 1908.  He married Edna Thom in 1939 and they had one child.  He was referred to as Laurie and is known to have played an active role in the Second World War.  His entry in the Service Records of the National Archives of Australia (www.naa.gov.au) confirms that: he was born at Perth; he enlisted at Perth; his service number was 161877; and his wife and next-of-kin was Edna Collett.

 

 

 

 

23Q16

Murray William Collett was born at Perth in 1909 and he married Jennifer.  He saw active service during World War II between 1938 and 1948.  His entry in the Service Records of the National Archives of Australia (www.naa.gov.au) confirms that: he was born at East Perth on 13th January 1909; he enlisted at Perth; his service number was 45044; and his next-of-kin was Sarah Collett.  Murray William Collett died during 1968. 

 

 

 

 

23Q17

Herbert Brayley Collett was born at Perth on 2nd August 1913 and he saw active service during the Second World War prior to getting married.  His entry in the Service Records of the National Archives of Australia (www.naa.gov.au) confirms that: he was born at East Perth; he enlisted at Kalgoolie; his service number was 29050; and his wife and next-of-kin was Olive Collett.  Herbert married Olive May Tyndall on 13th January 1944 and he died in 1973.  In the 1990s Olive was living at Stirling Street in Perth.

 

 

 

 

23Q18

Francis Edward Collett was born in 1920 and died in 1921.

 

 

 

 

23R4

DOROTHY ESTELLE COLLETT was born in 1936 and married Philip Shepherd in 1953.

 

 

 

 

23R5

Peter Graham Collett was born in 1939 and married Lorraine Gmelnor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX

 

 

 

DOCUMENTS USED IN THE SUPREME COURT OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

 

RELATING TO ROSE LAURA COLLETT (REF. 23P23) AND JOHAN AUGUST HEDLUND

 

 

 

 

 

In the Supreme Court of Western Australia

In the matter of HILDA HEDLUND and THELMA HEDLUND, infants

 

AND

 

In the matter of an act to amend the law relating to the custody of the abovementioned infants

 

 

The First Day of June 1916.  The Humble Petition of Rose Laura Hedlund presently residing at Napier Street, Cottesloe showeth:

 

1.   That your Petitioner is the wife of John August Hedlund labourer presently of 12 Francis Street, Perth and the mother of the abovementioned Hilda Hedlund and Thelma Hedlund aged seven and five years respectively.

 

2.   That your Petitioner has been living apart from her said husband since 21st Day of January 1913 under an Order of the Perth Police Court granting your Petitioner separation from her husband on the ground of his cruelty, also fifteen shillings per week maintenance.

 

3.   That the abovementioned children are in the custody of the said John August Hedlund and he has placed them at the Anglican Orphanage, Adelaide Terrace, Perth which is under the control of the Church of England in Western Australia.

 

4.   That the said John August Hedlund, without cause, caused the Petitioner to be excluded from access to the said children

 

Your Petitioner therefore humbly prays that an Order may be made giving her access at all reasonable times to the said children AND for such other order as in the circumstances may be just.

 

The Petitioner is presented by Rose Laura Hedlund through her solicitor, Walter Maxwell Nairn, Trustee Chambers, Barrack Street, Perth.

 

It is intended to serve this Petition on John August Hedlund of 12 Francis Street, Perth.

 

 

 

In the matter of HILDA HEDLUND

and THELMA HEDLUND, infants

 

 

I, ROSE LAURA HEDLUND presently residing at Napier Street, Cottesloe, make oath and say:

 

1.   I was married in 1906 to John August Hedlund labourer presently at 12 Francis Street, Perth and the abovementioned Hilda Hedlund and Thelma Hedlund are our children.

 

2.    In November 1912 I applied to this Honourable Court for a judicial separation on the ground of cruelty.  Pending the hearing, the children were placed under the control of the State, both parents having right of access.  The application for judicial separation failed and I returned to live with my husband but disagreements continued and on the 7th Day of January 1913 an Order was made in the Perth police Court granting me separation from my husband on the ground of cruelty, also fifteen shillings per week maintenance.  As both my husband and I claim custody of the children the Court decided that they shall be left in a neutral place where both parents might have access to them.

 

3.   On the 10th October 1913 the Colonial Secretary (the Hon. W C Angwin) directed that the children be boarded out on the following conditions:

 

“Both parents will be allowed reasonable access to the children but neither will have the right to remove them or interfere with their control”

 

4.    My husband continued to agitate for the control of the children and ultimately they were handed over to him on his definite undertaking that I should have access to them at all reasonable times.  This was confirmed by Mr Angwin in a letter to my solicitor dated 18th February 1914 in which Mr Angwin stated:

 

“Mr Hedlund promised me as you state in the presence of Mr Stonberg, that he is prepared to give his wife access to her children at all reasonable times and under this condition the full custody of the children has been handed over to him”

 

5.   My husband took the children to Sweden in April 1914 without giving me any intimation of his intention to move there.  He returned with the children about April 1915 and placed them in the Anglican orphanage, Adelaide Terrace, Perth.  There they have been visited by me at different times.

 

6.   About six months ago I was obliged to give up my employment in Perth and take work in the country.  I did not give my husband my country address because he had persistently molested me with communications which were very uncompromising in tone and often offensive.  As a result he gave instructions that I was not to be allowed to see the children.

 

 

7.    On the 25th May last I came to Perth for the purpose of seeing my children but I was informed by the authorities in charge of the Anglican Orphanage that they regretted they would not permit me to see the children as Mr Hedlund had given instructions to exclude me.

 

8.    On the 30th May last my solicitor wrote my husband the following letter:

 

“Mrs Hedlund has come to town to see the children but she finds that you have forbidden her to see them.  Apparently your only ground of complaint is that she will not give you her address.  At the present Mrs Hedlund is staying with her sister at the old address in Cottesloe and she is unwilling to give you her country address because of the unpleasantness which has invariably followed upon all your communications with her.  Your wife is by the separation order free to live where she chooses and you are not entitled to insist on her address.

 

You have complained to me personally about your wife taking legal steps against you but you refused to give her access to the children is only provoking repetition.  Mrs Hedlund wishes to avoid this course of action and I am sure it will be better for you both if you will act reasonably and withdraw the order you have given at the Church Office.  I am sending this letter by messenger and I shall be glad if you will give an intimation which the Church Office people can act upon.  Otherwise, if Mrs Hedlund is excluded entirely from access to her children she will have no option but to apply for an order.”

 

9.   My husband still refuses to permit me to see the children or to have any access to them.

 

 

 

Sworn at Perth in the State of Western Australia this first day of June One Thousand Nine Hundred and Sixteen before me Charles C Campbell – A Commissioner for taking oaths in the Supreme Court of Western Australia

 

 

 

In Chambers, before his Honour Mr Justice Burnside

 

Upon reading the Petition and the affidavit of Rose Laura Hedlund both dated the 1st Day of June 1916 and filed herein and upon having the solicitor for the Petitioner and the Respondent, John August Hedlund appearing in person:

 

It is ordered that the said Rose Laura Hedlund do have access at all reasonable times to the above named children Hilda Hedlund and Thelma Hedlund.

 

Dated the 8th Day of June 1916 – signed by J H Chalk, Associate to Mr Justice Burnside